Dietary antioxidant and mineral intake in humans is associated with reduced risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma but not reflux esophagitis or Barrett's esophagus

Seamus J. Murphy, Lesley A. Anderson, Heather R. Ferguson, Brian T. Johnston, Peter R. Watson, Jim McGuigan, Harry Comber, John V. Reynolds, Liam J. Murray, Marie M. Cantwell

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Abstract

The role of antioxidants in the pathogenesis of reflux esophagitis (RE), Barrett's esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) remains unknown. We evaluated the associations among dietary antioxidant intake and these diseases. We performed an assessment of dietary antioxidant intake in a case control study of RE (n = 219), BE (n = 220), EAC (n = 224), and matched population controls (n = 256) (the Factors Influencing the Barrett's Adenocarcinoma Relationship study) using a modification of a validated FFQ. We found that overall antioxidant index, a measure of the combined intake of vitamin C, vitamin E, total carotenoids, and selenium, was associated with a reduced risk of EAC [odds ratio (OR) = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.33-0.98], but not BE (OR = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.53-1.71) or RE (OR = 1.60; 95% CI = 0.86-2.98), for those in the highest compared with lowest category of intake. Those in the highest category of vitamin C intake had a lower risk of EAC (OR = 0.37; 95% CI = 0.21-0.66; P-trend = 0.001) and RE (OR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.24-0.90; P-trend = 0.03) compared with those in the lowest category. Vitamin C intake was not associated with BE, and intake of vitamin E, total carotenoids, zinc, copper, or selenium was not associated with EAC, BE, or RE. In conclusion, the overall antioxidant index was associated with a reduced risk of EAC. Higher dietary intake of vitamin C was associated with a reduced risk of EAC and RE. These results suggest that antioxidants may play a role in the pathogenesis of RE and EAC and may be more important in terms of progression rather than initiation of the disease process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1757-1763
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume140
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2010

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Murphy, S. J., Anderson, L. A., Ferguson, H. R., Johnston, B. T., Watson, P. R., McGuigan, J., Comber, H., Reynolds, J. V., Murray, L. J., & Cantwell, M. M. (2010). Dietary antioxidant and mineral intake in humans is associated with reduced risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma but not reflux esophagitis or Barrett's esophagus. Journal of Nutrition, 140(10), 1757-1763. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.110.124362