Differences between individuals resistant (DIOR) and susceptible (DIOS) to weight gain on a high-fat (HF) diet

C. Lawton, F. Croden, R. Alam, C. Golding, S. Whybrow, R. J. Stubbs, J. E. Blundell

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstract

Abstract

Aims:To characterise the feeding behaviour and activity in male S, matched for age and habitual high-fat (HF) diet, who are resistant (R) or susceptible (S) to diet-induced obesity (DIO). Methods:14 R and 14 S were characterised by BMI and 3d food diary and exposed to 2 separate laboratory probe days with meals, either all HF or all LF. A mandatory fixed breakfast (600kcal:16.7 or 33.4g fat)and lunch (800kcal:22.2 or 44.5g fat)were followed by ad-libitum dinner and snacks. VAS ratings of motivational variables were tracked hourly using the Leeds EARS methodology. Psychometric questionnaires were used to assess the eating motivation and feeding behaviour. Physical activity was assessed by the Baeke questionnaire. Results:S scored significantly higher than R on hunger and disinhibition main and sub-factors (TFEQ)and emotionality and externality factors (DEBQ);they were less active in leisure time than R (all pS scored significantly higher than R on hunger and disinhibition main and sub-factors (TFEQ)and emotionality and externality factors (DEBQ);they were less active in leisure time than R (all ponclusions: S showed a greater psychological predisposition to overeat (TFEQ,DEBQ scores),a higher level of hunger after fatty meals and a tendency towards inactivity, compared to R. This cluster of traits contributes to the risk factor profile that typifies phenotypes susceptible to diet-induced weight gain. Funded by the European Commission, Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources,QLK1-CT-2000-00515.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S218
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume28
Issue numberSuppl. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • DIO-R
  • DIO-S
  • high-fat consumers

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Differences between individuals resistant (DIOR) and susceptible (DIOS) to weight gain on a high-fat (HF) diet'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this