Differences in Long-Term Physical Activity Trajectories among Individuals with Chronic Widespread Pain: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial

K. R. Martin (Corresponding Author), K. L. Druce, S. E. Murdoch, L. D'Ambruoso, G. J. Macfarlane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background

Little is known about long‐term physical activity (PA) maintenance in those with chronic widespread pain (CWP) following an exercise intervention. This study examined PA over time to identify the existence and characteristics of subgroups following distinct PA trajectories.

Methods

Data come from individuals with CWP who took part in a 2x2 factorial randomized controlled trial, receiving either exercise or both exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy treatment. Information, including self‐report PA, was collected at baseline recruitment, immediately post‐intervention, 3, 24 and 60+ month post‐treatment. Analyses were conducted on 196 men and women with ≥3 PA data‐points. Group‐based trajectory modelling was used to identify latent PA trajectory groups and baseline characteristics (e.g., demographics, pain, self‐rated health, fatigue, coping‐strategy use, kinesiophobia) of these groups.

Results

The best fitting model identified was one with three trajectories: “non‐engagers” (n=32), “maintainers” (n=144) and “super‐maintainers” (n=20). Overall, mean baseline PA levels were significantly different between groups (non‐engagers: 1.1; maintainers: 4.6; super‐maintainers: 8.6, p<0.001) and all other follow‐up points. Non‐engagers reported, on average, greater BMI, higher disabling chronic pain, poorer self‐rated health, physical functioning, as well as greater use of passive coping strategies and lower use of active coping strategies.

Conclusions

The majority of individuals with CWP receiving exercise as part of a trial were identified as long‐term PA maintainers. Participants with poorer physical health and coping response to symptoms were identified as non‐engagers. For optimal symptom management, a stratified approach may enhance initiation and long‐term PA maintenance in individuals with CWP.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Pain
Early online date24 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 May 2019

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Chronic Pain
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Health
Maintenance
Cognitive Therapy
Fatigue
Demography
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

@article{4c8b092272404770bcfdc90157279a96,
title = "Differences in Long-Term Physical Activity Trajectories among Individuals with Chronic Widespread Pain: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial",
abstract = "BackgroundLittle is known about long‐term physical activity (PA) maintenance in those with chronic widespread pain (CWP) following an exercise intervention. This study examined PA over time to identify the existence and characteristics of subgroups following distinct PA trajectories.MethodsData come from individuals with CWP who took part in a 2x2 factorial randomized controlled trial, receiving either exercise or both exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy treatment. Information, including self‐report PA, was collected at baseline recruitment, immediately post‐intervention, 3, 24 and 60+ month post‐treatment. Analyses were conducted on 196 men and women with ≥3 PA data‐points. Group‐based trajectory modelling was used to identify latent PA trajectory groups and baseline characteristics (e.g., demographics, pain, self‐rated health, fatigue, coping‐strategy use, kinesiophobia) of these groups.ResultsThe best fitting model identified was one with three trajectories: “non‐engagers” (n=32), “maintainers” (n=144) and “super‐maintainers” (n=20). Overall, mean baseline PA levels were significantly different between groups (non‐engagers: 1.1; maintainers: 4.6; super‐maintainers: 8.6, p<0.001) and all other follow‐up points. Non‐engagers reported, on average, greater BMI, higher disabling chronic pain, poorer self‐rated health, physical functioning, as well as greater use of passive coping strategies and lower use of active coping strategies.ConclusionsThe majority of individuals with CWP receiving exercise as part of a trial were identified as long‐term PA maintainers. Participants with poorer physical health and coping response to symptoms were identified as non‐engagers. For optimal symptom management, a stratified approach may enhance initiation and long‐term PA maintenance in individuals with CWP.",
author = "Martin, {K. R.} and Druce, {K. L.} and Murdoch, {S. E.} and L. D'Ambruoso and Macfarlane, {G. J.}",
note = "Funding Sources: The MUSICIAN trial was funded by Arthritis Research UK, Chesterfield, UK (Grant award number 17292) and the MELODIC study was funded by NHS Grampian Endowment Grant, Project No: 14/40.",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1002/ejp.1410",
language = "English",
journal = "European Journal of Pain",
issn = "1090-3801",
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T1 - Differences in Long-Term Physical Activity Trajectories among Individuals with Chronic Widespread Pain

T2 - A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial

AU - Martin, K. R.

AU - Druce, K. L.

AU - Murdoch, S. E.

AU - D'Ambruoso, L.

AU - Macfarlane, G. J.

N1 - Funding Sources: The MUSICIAN trial was funded by Arthritis Research UK, Chesterfield, UK (Grant award number 17292) and the MELODIC study was funded by NHS Grampian Endowment Grant, Project No: 14/40.

PY - 2019/5/24

Y1 - 2019/5/24

N2 - BackgroundLittle is known about long‐term physical activity (PA) maintenance in those with chronic widespread pain (CWP) following an exercise intervention. This study examined PA over time to identify the existence and characteristics of subgroups following distinct PA trajectories.MethodsData come from individuals with CWP who took part in a 2x2 factorial randomized controlled trial, receiving either exercise or both exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy treatment. Information, including self‐report PA, was collected at baseline recruitment, immediately post‐intervention, 3, 24 and 60+ month post‐treatment. Analyses were conducted on 196 men and women with ≥3 PA data‐points. Group‐based trajectory modelling was used to identify latent PA trajectory groups and baseline characteristics (e.g., demographics, pain, self‐rated health, fatigue, coping‐strategy use, kinesiophobia) of these groups.ResultsThe best fitting model identified was one with three trajectories: “non‐engagers” (n=32), “maintainers” (n=144) and “super‐maintainers” (n=20). Overall, mean baseline PA levels were significantly different between groups (non‐engagers: 1.1; maintainers: 4.6; super‐maintainers: 8.6, p<0.001) and all other follow‐up points. Non‐engagers reported, on average, greater BMI, higher disabling chronic pain, poorer self‐rated health, physical functioning, as well as greater use of passive coping strategies and lower use of active coping strategies.ConclusionsThe majority of individuals with CWP receiving exercise as part of a trial were identified as long‐term PA maintainers. Participants with poorer physical health and coping response to symptoms were identified as non‐engagers. For optimal symptom management, a stratified approach may enhance initiation and long‐term PA maintenance in individuals with CWP.

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