Differences in the job satisfaction of high-paid and low-paid workers across Europe

Konstantinos Pouliakas, Ioannis Theodossiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data from six waves of the European Community Household Panel (1996–2001) in 11 countries suggest that low-paid employees are significantly less satisfied with their job than the high-paid in southern Europe, but not in the northern countries. Proxying job satisfaction for job quality, the authors show that while low-paid employment does not necessarily mean low-quality employment, workers in some countries suffer the double penalty of low pay and low job quality. Such dualism across European labour markets, they argue, reflects different country-level approaches to the trade-off between flexibility and security, calling for a policy focus on the latter to enhance job quality.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-29
Number of pages29
JournalInternational Labour Review
Volume149
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Job satisfaction
Personnel
Job quality
Workers
European Union

Keywords

  • job satisfaction
  • wages
  • low wages
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Denmark
  • Finland
  • Greece
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Portugal
  • Spain
  • United Kingdom

Cite this

Differences in the job satisfaction of high-paid and low-paid workers across Europe. / Pouliakas, Konstantinos; Theodossiou, Ioannis.

In: International Labour Review, Vol. 149, No. 1, 03.2010, p. 1-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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