Dining in aristocratic households of nineteenth-century France

a study of female authority

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

During the long nineteenth century gastronomy emerged as a cultural field in France and intersected with the established cultural field of hospitality. In the role of hostess noblewomen were acknowledged leaders in hospitality, but the gradual transformation of this field led to an evolution in their position relative to that of men in professions such as chef, sommelier and food critic. This article examines the consumption and production involved in dining among the nobility. At a dinner party nobles enjoyed fine food and drink, indulged in gossip and conversation, and received attention from servants. Simultaneously, the hostess and guests perpetuated social traditions, consolidated friendships and kin networks, and reproduced the gendered bodily practices associated with aristocratic distinction. Prior to 1914 the activity of hosting dinners placed noblewomen ahead of male chefs, sommeliers and food critics in the field of social power.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-123
Number of pages19
JournalVirtus. Journal of Nobility Studies
Volume23
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

Fingerprint

Dining
Nineteenth-century France
Household
Food
Authority
Noblewomen
Chefs
Hospitality
Hostess
Nobility
Dinner
Friendship
Gossip
Servants
France
Gastronomy
Nobles
Social Power
Dinner Party

Cite this

@article{c876c26332af4c3097272f7e186bf5d1,
title = "Dining in aristocratic households of nineteenth-century France: a study of female authority",
abstract = "During the long nineteenth century gastronomy emerged as a cultural field in France and intersected with the established cultural field of hospitality. In the role of hostess noblewomen were acknowledged leaders in hospitality, but the gradual transformation of this field led to an evolution in their position relative to that of men in professions such as chef, sommelier and food critic. This article examines the consumption and production involved in dining among the nobility. At a dinner party nobles enjoyed fine food and drink, indulged in gossip and conversation, and received attention from servants. Simultaneously, the hostess and guests perpetuated social traditions, consolidated friendships and kin networks, and reproduced the gendered bodily practices associated with aristocratic distinction. Prior to 1914 the activity of hosting dinners placed noblewomen ahead of male chefs, sommeliers and food critics in the field of social power.",
author = "Macknight, {Elizabeth C.}",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "105--123",
journal = "Virtus. Journal of Nobility Studies",
issn = "1380-6130",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dining in aristocratic households of nineteenth-century France

T2 - a study of female authority

AU - Macknight, Elizabeth C.

PY - 2016/12

Y1 - 2016/12

N2 - During the long nineteenth century gastronomy emerged as a cultural field in France and intersected with the established cultural field of hospitality. In the role of hostess noblewomen were acknowledged leaders in hospitality, but the gradual transformation of this field led to an evolution in their position relative to that of men in professions such as chef, sommelier and food critic. This article examines the consumption and production involved in dining among the nobility. At a dinner party nobles enjoyed fine food and drink, indulged in gossip and conversation, and received attention from servants. Simultaneously, the hostess and guests perpetuated social traditions, consolidated friendships and kin networks, and reproduced the gendered bodily practices associated with aristocratic distinction. Prior to 1914 the activity of hosting dinners placed noblewomen ahead of male chefs, sommeliers and food critics in the field of social power.

AB - During the long nineteenth century gastronomy emerged as a cultural field in France and intersected with the established cultural field of hospitality. In the role of hostess noblewomen were acknowledged leaders in hospitality, but the gradual transformation of this field led to an evolution in their position relative to that of men in professions such as chef, sommelier and food critic. This article examines the consumption and production involved in dining among the nobility. At a dinner party nobles enjoyed fine food and drink, indulged in gossip and conversation, and received attention from servants. Simultaneously, the hostess and guests perpetuated social traditions, consolidated friendships and kin networks, and reproduced the gendered bodily practices associated with aristocratic distinction. Prior to 1914 the activity of hosting dinners placed noblewomen ahead of male chefs, sommeliers and food critics in the field of social power.

UR - http://adelsgeschiedenis.nl/index.php/en/

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 105

EP - 123

JO - Virtus. Journal of Nobility Studies

JF - Virtus. Journal of Nobility Studies

SN - 1380-6130

ER -