Do action systems resist visual illusions?

David Peter Matthew Carey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

166 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Arguments about the relative independence of visual modules in the primate brain are not new. Recently, though, these debates have resurfaced in the form of arguments about the extent to which visuomotor reaching and grasping systems are insensitive to visual illusions that dramatically bias visual perception. The first wave of studies of illusory effects on perception and action have supported the idea of independence of motor systems, but recent findings have been more critical. In this article, I review several of these studies, most of which (but not all) can be reconciled with the two-visual-systems model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-113
Number of pages4
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • SIZE-CONTRAST ILLUSIONS
  • GRASPING MOVEMENTS
  • GRIP-APERTURE
  • FORM AGNOSIA
  • PERCEPTION
  • PREHENSION
  • OBJECT
  • DISSOCIATION
  • POSITION
  • PATIENT

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