Do brain networks evolve by maximizing their information flow capacity?

Chris G. Antonopoulos, Shambhavi Srivastava, Sandro E. de S. Pinto, Murilo S. Baptista

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

We propose a working hypothesis supported by numerical simulations that brain networks evolve based on the principle of the maximization of their internal information flow capacity. We find that synchronous behavior and capacity of information flow of the evolved networks reproduce well the same behaviors observed in the brain dynamical networks of Caenorhabditis elegans and humans, networks of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with graphs given by these brain networks. We make a strong case to verify our hypothesis by showing that the neural networks with the closest graph distance to the brain networks of Caenorhabditis elegans and humans are the Hindmarsh-Rose neural networks evolved with coupling strengths that maximize information flow capacity. Surprisingly, we find that global neural synchronization levels decrease during brain evolution, reflecting on an underlying global no Hebbian-like evolution process, which is driven by no Hebbian-like learning behaviors for some of the clusters during evolution, and Hebbian-like learning rules for clusters where neurons increase their synchronization.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1004372
Number of pages29
JournalPLoS Computational Biology
Volume11
Issue number8
Early online date28 Aug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Aug 2015

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Information Flow
brain
Brain
Caenorhabditis elegans
neural networks
Neurons
Synchronization
Rosa
learning
neurons
Learning
Neuron
Neural networks
Neural Networks
Graph Distance
Internal Flow
Rule Learning
Maximise
Verify
Computer simulation

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Do brain networks evolve by maximizing their information flow capacity? / Antonopoulos, Chris G.; Srivastava, Shambhavi; E. de S. Pinto, Sandro; Baptista, Murilo S.

In: PLoS Computational Biology , Vol. 11, No. 8, e1004372, 28.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Antonopoulos, Chris G. ; Srivastava, Shambhavi ; E. de S. Pinto, Sandro ; Baptista, Murilo S. / Do brain networks evolve by maximizing their information flow capacity?. In: PLoS Computational Biology . 2015 ; Vol. 11, No. 8.
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