Do low-carbohydrate diets increase energy expenditure?

Kevin D Hall* (Corresponding Author), Juen Guo, John R Speakman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Proponents of low-carbohydrate diets have claimed that such diets result in a substantial increase in total energy expenditure (TEE) amounting to 400–600 kcal/day [1] thereby providing patients with a “high calorie way to stay thin forever” [2]. However, a recent systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled feeding studies found no meaningful TEE effects comparing isocaloric diets with equivalent amounts of protein but varying in their proportion of carbohydrate to fat [3]. Nevertheless, it is possible that these past studies may have failed to create the appropriate conditions to reveal the hypothesized increase in TEE during a low-carbohydrate diet [4].

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2350-2354
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume43
Early online date23 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Fingerprint

Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet
Energy Metabolism
Diet
Meta-Analysis
Fats
Carbohydrates
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Do low-carbohydrate diets increase energy expenditure? / Hall, Kevin D (Corresponding Author); Guo, Juen; Speakman, John R.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 43, 12.2019, p. 2350-2354.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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