Do we have distinct systems for immediate and delayed actions? A selective review on the role of visual memory in action

Thomas Schenk, Constanze Hesse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The perception-action model with its assumptions of distinct visual pathways for perception and visuomotor control has been highly influential but also contentious. The controversy largely focused on the evidence from studies on perceptual illusions and this scientific field has been reviewed quite a few times in recent years. In contrast another aspect of the model, namely the role of visual memory in action control, received comparatively little attention. With respect to visual memory the perception-action model proposes that only the perceptual or ventral stream can maintain a sustained representation of the visual world while the visuomotor system or dorsal stream has to rely on currently available visual information. Consequently, visual information from the dorsal system cannot guide actions that are based on memorized visual information. We call this feature of the perception-action model: the dorsal amnesia hypothesis. There are at least two reasons for why this hypothesis is of special relevance. Firstly, it provides a particularly clear criterion to distinguish between functions of the ventral and dorsal stream. Secondly, this hypothesis led to some unexpected discoveries which provided particularly compelling evidence in favour of the model. In this review, we will revisit all relevant empirical areas, ranging from physiological examinations and neuropsychological studies to behavioural experiments in neurologically intact participants. Based on this review, we conclude that the dorsal amnesia hypothesis is in our view no longer tenable.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)228-248
Number of pages21
JournalCortex
Volume98
Early online date25 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Visual Perception
Amnesia
Visual Pathways
Information Systems

Keywords

  • perception
  • action
  • memory
  • optic ataxia
  • illusion
  • agnosia
  • fMRI
  • allocentric
  • egocentric

Cite this

Do we have distinct systems for immediate and delayed actions? A selective review on the role of visual memory in action. / Schenk, Thomas; Hesse, Constanze.

In: Cortex, Vol. 98, 01.2018, p. 228-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{188bde59c82d4a68aab9e7ff7007f733,
title = "Do we have distinct systems for immediate and delayed actions? A selective review on the role of visual memory in action",
abstract = "The perception-action model with its assumptions of distinct visual pathways for perception and visuomotor control has been highly influential but also contentious. The controversy largely focused on the evidence from studies on perceptual illusions and this scientific field has been reviewed quite a few times in recent years. In contrast another aspect of the model, namely the role of visual memory in action control, received comparatively little attention. With respect to visual memory the perception-action model proposes that only the perceptual or ventral stream can maintain a sustained representation of the visual world while the visuomotor system or dorsal stream has to rely on currently available visual information. Consequently, visual information from the dorsal system cannot guide actions that are based on memorized visual information. We call this feature of the perception-action model: the dorsal amnesia hypothesis. There are at least two reasons for why this hypothesis is of special relevance. Firstly, it provides a particularly clear criterion to distinguish between functions of the ventral and dorsal stream. Secondly, this hypothesis led to some unexpected discoveries which provided particularly compelling evidence in favour of the model. In this review, we will revisit all relevant empirical areas, ranging from physiological examinations and neuropsychological studies to behavioural experiments in neurologically intact participants. Based on this review, we conclude that the dorsal amnesia hypothesis is in our view no longer tenable.",
keywords = "perception, action , memory, optic ataxia, illusion, agnosia, fMRI, allocentric, egocentric",
author = "Thomas Schenk and Constanze Hesse",
note = "Thomas Schenk was supported by grants from the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG, grant no’s: DFG-SCHE 735/2-1 and DFG-SCHE 735/3-1).",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.cortex.2017.05.014",
language = "English",
volume = "98",
pages = "228--248",
journal = "Cortex",
issn = "0010-9452",
publisher = "Masson SpA",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do we have distinct systems for immediate and delayed actions? A selective review on the role of visual memory in action

AU - Schenk, Thomas

AU - Hesse, Constanze

N1 - Thomas Schenk was supported by grants from the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG, grant no’s: DFG-SCHE 735/2-1 and DFG-SCHE 735/3-1).

PY - 2018/1

Y1 - 2018/1

N2 - The perception-action model with its assumptions of distinct visual pathways for perception and visuomotor control has been highly influential but also contentious. The controversy largely focused on the evidence from studies on perceptual illusions and this scientific field has been reviewed quite a few times in recent years. In contrast another aspect of the model, namely the role of visual memory in action control, received comparatively little attention. With respect to visual memory the perception-action model proposes that only the perceptual or ventral stream can maintain a sustained representation of the visual world while the visuomotor system or dorsal stream has to rely on currently available visual information. Consequently, visual information from the dorsal system cannot guide actions that are based on memorized visual information. We call this feature of the perception-action model: the dorsal amnesia hypothesis. There are at least two reasons for why this hypothesis is of special relevance. Firstly, it provides a particularly clear criterion to distinguish between functions of the ventral and dorsal stream. Secondly, this hypothesis led to some unexpected discoveries which provided particularly compelling evidence in favour of the model. In this review, we will revisit all relevant empirical areas, ranging from physiological examinations and neuropsychological studies to behavioural experiments in neurologically intact participants. Based on this review, we conclude that the dorsal amnesia hypothesis is in our view no longer tenable.

AB - The perception-action model with its assumptions of distinct visual pathways for perception and visuomotor control has been highly influential but also contentious. The controversy largely focused on the evidence from studies on perceptual illusions and this scientific field has been reviewed quite a few times in recent years. In contrast another aspect of the model, namely the role of visual memory in action control, received comparatively little attention. With respect to visual memory the perception-action model proposes that only the perceptual or ventral stream can maintain a sustained representation of the visual world while the visuomotor system or dorsal stream has to rely on currently available visual information. Consequently, visual information from the dorsal system cannot guide actions that are based on memorized visual information. We call this feature of the perception-action model: the dorsal amnesia hypothesis. There are at least two reasons for why this hypothesis is of special relevance. Firstly, it provides a particularly clear criterion to distinguish between functions of the ventral and dorsal stream. Secondly, this hypothesis led to some unexpected discoveries which provided particularly compelling evidence in favour of the model. In this review, we will revisit all relevant empirical areas, ranging from physiological examinations and neuropsychological studies to behavioural experiments in neurologically intact participants. Based on this review, we conclude that the dorsal amnesia hypothesis is in our view no longer tenable.

KW - perception

KW - action

KW - memory

KW - optic ataxia

KW - illusion

KW - agnosia

KW - fMRI

KW - allocentric

KW - egocentric

U2 - 10.1016/j.cortex.2017.05.014

DO - 10.1016/j.cortex.2017.05.014

M3 - Article

VL - 98

SP - 228

EP - 248

JO - Cortex

JF - Cortex

SN - 0010-9452

ER -