Do you see what I see? School perspectives of deaf children, hearing children and their parents

Marc Marschark, Rebecca Bull, Patty Sapere, Emily Nordmann, Wendy A. Skene, Jennifer Lukomski, Sarah J. Lumsden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Perspectives on academic and social aspects of children's school experiences were obtained from deaf and hearing children and their (deaf or hearing) parents. Possible differences between (1) the views of children and their parents and (2) those of hearing children and their parents compared to deaf children and their parents were of particular interest. Overall, parents gave their children higher school friendship ratings than the children gave themselves, and hearing children and their parents were more positive about children's friendships than were deaf children and their parents. Both children and parents also saw deaf children as less successful in reading than hearing children. However, deaf children having deaf parents, attending a school for the deaf and using sign language at home all were associated with more positive perceptions of social success. Use of cochlear implants was not associated with perceptions of greater academic or social success. These and related findings are discussed in the context of parent and child perspectives on social and academic functioning and particular challenges confronted by deaf children in regular school settings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)483-497
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Journal of Special Needs Education
Volume27
Issue number4
Early online date3 Sep 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Hearing
parents
Parents
school
friendship
Sign Language
Social Perception
regular school
Cochlear Implants
Reading
rating

Keywords

  • deaf
  • social-emotional functioning
  • schooling
  • mathematics
  • parent-child communication

Cite this

Marschark, M., Bull, R., Sapere, P., Nordmann, E., Skene, W. A., Lukomski, J., & Lumsden, S. J. (2012). Do you see what I see? School perspectives of deaf children, hearing children and their parents. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 27(4), 483-497. https://doi.org/10.1080/08856257.2012.719106

Do you see what I see? School perspectives of deaf children, hearing children and their parents. / Marschark, Marc; Bull, Rebecca; Sapere, Patty; Nordmann, Emily; Skene, Wendy A.; Lukomski, Jennifer; Lumsden, Sarah J.

In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, Vol. 27, No. 4, 2012, p. 483-497.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marschark, M, Bull, R, Sapere, P, Nordmann, E, Skene, WA, Lukomski, J & Lumsden, SJ 2012, 'Do you see what I see? School perspectives of deaf children, hearing children and their parents', European Journal of Special Needs Education, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 483-497. https://doi.org/10.1080/08856257.2012.719106
Marschark, Marc ; Bull, Rebecca ; Sapere, Patty ; Nordmann, Emily ; Skene, Wendy A. ; Lukomski, Jennifer ; Lumsden, Sarah J. / Do you see what I see? School perspectives of deaf children, hearing children and their parents. In: European Journal of Special Needs Education. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 483-497.
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