Does age acquired immunity confer selective protection to common serotypes of Campylobacter jejuni?

Gordon Miller, Geoff M Dunn, Thomas M S Reid, Iain D Ogden, Norval J C Strachan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background
Campylobacter infection is a major cause of bacterial gastrointestinal disease. Exposure to Campylobacter is known to produce an immune response in humans that can prevent future symptomatic infections. Further, studies of the general population have shown that seroprevalence to Campylobacter increases with age.

Methods
A large collection of serotyped Campylobacter isolates, obtained from human clinical faecal samples, were analysed by comparing the ratio of uncommon to common serotypes by different age groups, using χ2 tests.

Results
We have identified that older age groups, as well as having generally lower incidence, are significantly less likely to be infected by the more common serotypes.

Conclusion
These results are indicative of acquired immunity, however, further studies are needed to rule out the confounding effects of the variations in exposure pathways experienced by different age groups.
Original languageEnglish
Article number66
Number of pages5
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2005

Keywords

  • antibody-responses
  • infection
  • antigens
  • poultry
  • risk
  • coli

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does age acquired immunity confer selective protection to common serotypes of Campylobacter jejuni?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this