Does socioeconomic inequality explain ethnic differences in nicotine dependence? Evidence from a New Zealand birth cohort.

Dannette Marie, David Fergusson, Joseph Boden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The present study examined the role of socioeconomic status and cultural identity in the association between ethnicity and nicotine dependence, in a birth cohort of >1000 methods young people studied to age 30.

Methods: Data were gathered on ethnicity, cultural identification, nicotine dependence, and socioeconomic factors, as part of a longitudinal study of a New Zealand birth cohort (the Christchurch Health and Development Study).

Results: Those reporting Maori identity had rates of nicotine dependence that were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than rates for non-Maori. Control for socioeconomic factors reduced the associations between ethnic identity and nicotine dependence to statistical non-significance. In addition, there was no evidence of a statistically significant association between Maori cultural identity and nicotine dependence, nor was there evidence of gender differences in the association between ethnic identity and nicotine dependence, after controlling for socioeconomic factors.

Conclusions: The higher rates of nicotine dependence observed among Maori appear to be attributable to differences in socioeconomic status. Efforts to improve the socioeconomic standing of Maori should therefore help to reduce rates of nicotine dependence in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)378-383
Number of pages6
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

Keywords

  • ethnic identity
  • longitudinal study
  • New Zealand Maori
  • nicotine dependence
  • socioeconomic status

Cite this

Does socioeconomic inequality explain ethnic differences in nicotine dependence? Evidence from a New Zealand birth cohort. / Marie, Dannette; Fergusson, David; Boden, Joseph.

In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 44, No. 4, 04.2010, p. 378-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{710ac6ee07034aa9b647966846e94e2c,
title = "Does socioeconomic inequality explain ethnic differences in nicotine dependence?: Evidence from a New Zealand birth cohort.",
abstract = "Objective: The present study examined the role of socioeconomic status and cultural identity in the association between ethnicity and nicotine dependence, in a birth cohort of >1000 methods young people studied to age 30. Methods: Data were gathered on ethnicity, cultural identification, nicotine dependence, and socioeconomic factors, as part of a longitudinal study of a New Zealand birth cohort (the Christchurch Health and Development Study). Results: Those reporting Maori identity had rates of nicotine dependence that were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than rates for non-Maori. Control for socioeconomic factors reduced the associations between ethnic identity and nicotine dependence to statistical non-significance. In addition, there was no evidence of a statistically significant association between Maori cultural identity and nicotine dependence, nor was there evidence of gender differences in the association between ethnic identity and nicotine dependence, after controlling for socioeconomic factors. Conclusions: The higher rates of nicotine dependence observed among Maori appear to be attributable to differences in socioeconomic status. Efforts to improve the socioeconomic standing of Maori should therefore help to reduce rates of nicotine dependence in this population.",
keywords = "ethnic identity, longitudinal study, New Zealand Maori, nicotine dependence, socioeconomic status",
author = "Dannette Marie and David Fergusson and Joseph Boden",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
doi = "10.3109/00048670903489908",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "378--383",
journal = "Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0004-8674",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does socioeconomic inequality explain ethnic differences in nicotine dependence?

T2 - Evidence from a New Zealand birth cohort.

AU - Marie, Dannette

AU - Fergusson, David

AU - Boden, Joseph

PY - 2010/4

Y1 - 2010/4

N2 - Objective: The present study examined the role of socioeconomic status and cultural identity in the association between ethnicity and nicotine dependence, in a birth cohort of >1000 methods young people studied to age 30. Methods: Data were gathered on ethnicity, cultural identification, nicotine dependence, and socioeconomic factors, as part of a longitudinal study of a New Zealand birth cohort (the Christchurch Health and Development Study). Results: Those reporting Maori identity had rates of nicotine dependence that were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than rates for non-Maori. Control for socioeconomic factors reduced the associations between ethnic identity and nicotine dependence to statistical non-significance. In addition, there was no evidence of a statistically significant association between Maori cultural identity and nicotine dependence, nor was there evidence of gender differences in the association between ethnic identity and nicotine dependence, after controlling for socioeconomic factors. Conclusions: The higher rates of nicotine dependence observed among Maori appear to be attributable to differences in socioeconomic status. Efforts to improve the socioeconomic standing of Maori should therefore help to reduce rates of nicotine dependence in this population.

AB - Objective: The present study examined the role of socioeconomic status and cultural identity in the association between ethnicity and nicotine dependence, in a birth cohort of >1000 methods young people studied to age 30. Methods: Data were gathered on ethnicity, cultural identification, nicotine dependence, and socioeconomic factors, as part of a longitudinal study of a New Zealand birth cohort (the Christchurch Health and Development Study). Results: Those reporting Maori identity had rates of nicotine dependence that were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than rates for non-Maori. Control for socioeconomic factors reduced the associations between ethnic identity and nicotine dependence to statistical non-significance. In addition, there was no evidence of a statistically significant association between Maori cultural identity and nicotine dependence, nor was there evidence of gender differences in the association between ethnic identity and nicotine dependence, after controlling for socioeconomic factors. Conclusions: The higher rates of nicotine dependence observed among Maori appear to be attributable to differences in socioeconomic status. Efforts to improve the socioeconomic standing of Maori should therefore help to reduce rates of nicotine dependence in this population.

KW - ethnic identity

KW - longitudinal study

KW - New Zealand Maori

KW - nicotine dependence

KW - socioeconomic status

U2 - 10.3109/00048670903489908

DO - 10.3109/00048670903489908

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 378

EP - 383

JO - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry

JF - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0004-8674

IS - 4

ER -