Dog-craft

a history of Gwich'in and dogs in the Canadian North

Jan Peter Laurens Loovers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this article I propose the notion of dog-craft and explore the expansion of the capital markets in the circumpolar North. Through the fur trade and mineral extractions, indigenous people incorporated and improvised the use of dog teams for trapping, fishing, hunting, and gathering. This article focuses on the Gwich’in people in the northwestern corner of Canada. I elaborate on the history of crafts related to dogs as well as to the dogs themselves. In most recent times, following the disappearance of a particular type of dog – the working dog – these crafts have vanished for the greater part.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)387-419
Number of pages33
JournalHunter-Gatherer Research
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015

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capital market
Canada
history
time

Keywords

  • Gwich'in
  • dogs
  • Hudson's Bay Company fur trade
  • history

Cite this

Dog-craft : a history of Gwich'in and dogs in the Canadian North. / Loovers, Jan Peter Laurens.

In: Hunter-Gatherer Research, Vol. 1, No. 4, 12.2015, p. 387-419.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Loovers, Jan Peter Laurens. / Dog-craft : a history of Gwich'in and dogs in the Canadian North. In: Hunter-Gatherer Research. 2015 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 387-419.
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abstract = "In this article I propose the notion of dog-craft and explore the expansion of the capital markets in the circumpolar North. Through the fur trade and mineral extractions, indigenous people incorporated and improvised the use of dog teams for trapping, fishing, hunting, and gathering. This article focuses on the Gwich’in people in the northwestern corner of Canada. I elaborate on the history of crafts related to dogs as well as to the dogs themselves. In most recent times, following the disappearance of a particular type of dog – the working dog – these crafts have vanished for the greater part.",
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