Don't save the ball!

Doreen Mary MacGregor

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objectives: To identify, over a period of 12 months, all attendances at an accident and emergency department by children over the age of 5 years with an injury to a wrist, hand, or finger, and to examine those sustained as a result of a blow from a ball.

    Methods: The case notes of all children aged 6-13 years attending the Accident and Emergency Department of the Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital in the year 2001 as a result of a wrist, hand, or finger injury sustained from a blow by a ball were reviewed, and the cause, type, and severity of the injury noted.

    Results: A total of 187 children were identified; 69% were boys and football was the main sport involved. Most (93%) were radiographed, and 40% were positive; most fractures were sustained outwith school. Hand dominance was not significant.

    Conclusions: These injuries are common and may be preventable with modification of rules, equipment, and coaching. A register of youth sporting injuries may show if there are any detrimental long term effects.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)351-353
    Number of pages2
    JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
    Volume37
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Keywords

    • FOOTBALL INJURIES
    • SPORTS INJURIES
    • CHILDREN
    • EMERGENCY
    • SOCCER
    • FRACTURES
    • PLAYERS

    Cite this

    Don't save the ball! / MacGregor, Doreen Mary.

    In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 4, 2003, p. 351-353.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    MacGregor, Doreen Mary. / Don't save the ball!. In: British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2003 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 351-353.
    @article{f4f94bb38f3f4df9aa18a97517160fcd,
    title = "Don't save the ball!",
    abstract = "Objectives: To identify, over a period of 12 months, all attendances at an accident and emergency department by children over the age of 5 years with an injury to a wrist, hand, or finger, and to examine those sustained as a result of a blow from a ball.Methods: The case notes of all children aged 6-13 years attending the Accident and Emergency Department of the Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital in the year 2001 as a result of a wrist, hand, or finger injury sustained from a blow by a ball were reviewed, and the cause, type, and severity of the injury noted.Results: A total of 187 children were identified; 69{\%} were boys and football was the main sport involved. Most (93{\%}) were radiographed, and 40{\%} were positive; most fractures were sustained outwith school. Hand dominance was not significant.Conclusions: These injuries are common and may be preventable with modification of rules, equipment, and coaching. A register of youth sporting injuries may show if there are any detrimental long term effects.",
    keywords = "FOOTBALL INJURIES, SPORTS INJURIES, CHILDREN, EMERGENCY, SOCCER, FRACTURES, PLAYERS",
    author = "MacGregor, {Doreen Mary}",
    year = "2003",
    doi = "10.1136/bjsm.37.4.351",
    language = "English",
    volume = "37",
    pages = "351--353",
    journal = "British Journal of Sports Medicine",
    issn = "0306-3674",
    publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
    number = "4",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Don't save the ball!

    AU - MacGregor, Doreen Mary

    PY - 2003

    Y1 - 2003

    N2 - Objectives: To identify, over a period of 12 months, all attendances at an accident and emergency department by children over the age of 5 years with an injury to a wrist, hand, or finger, and to examine those sustained as a result of a blow from a ball.Methods: The case notes of all children aged 6-13 years attending the Accident and Emergency Department of the Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital in the year 2001 as a result of a wrist, hand, or finger injury sustained from a blow by a ball were reviewed, and the cause, type, and severity of the injury noted.Results: A total of 187 children were identified; 69% were boys and football was the main sport involved. Most (93%) were radiographed, and 40% were positive; most fractures were sustained outwith school. Hand dominance was not significant.Conclusions: These injuries are common and may be preventable with modification of rules, equipment, and coaching. A register of youth sporting injuries may show if there are any detrimental long term effects.

    AB - Objectives: To identify, over a period of 12 months, all attendances at an accident and emergency department by children over the age of 5 years with an injury to a wrist, hand, or finger, and to examine those sustained as a result of a blow from a ball.Methods: The case notes of all children aged 6-13 years attending the Accident and Emergency Department of the Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital in the year 2001 as a result of a wrist, hand, or finger injury sustained from a blow by a ball were reviewed, and the cause, type, and severity of the injury noted.Results: A total of 187 children were identified; 69% were boys and football was the main sport involved. Most (93%) were radiographed, and 40% were positive; most fractures were sustained outwith school. Hand dominance was not significant.Conclusions: These injuries are common and may be preventable with modification of rules, equipment, and coaching. A register of youth sporting injuries may show if there are any detrimental long term effects.

    KW - FOOTBALL INJURIES

    KW - SPORTS INJURIES

    KW - CHILDREN

    KW - EMERGENCY

    KW - SOCCER

    KW - FRACTURES

    KW - PLAYERS

    U2 - 10.1136/bjsm.37.4.351

    DO - 10.1136/bjsm.37.4.351

    M3 - Article

    VL - 37

    SP - 351

    EP - 353

    JO - British Journal of Sports Medicine

    JF - British Journal of Sports Medicine

    SN - 0306-3674

    IS - 4

    ER -