Dose-related effects of eicosapentaenoic acid on innate immune function in healthy humans: a comparison of young and older men

Dinka Rees, Elizabeth A Miles, Tapati Banerjee, Solenne J Wells, Catherine E Roynette, Klaus Wj Wahle, Philip C Calder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Increasing intakes of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can decrease markers of immunity. However, dose- and age-related responses have not been identified.

OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine the effects of different amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on innate immune outcomes in young and older males.

DESIGN: In a controlled, double-blind study, healthy young and older men consumed 1 of 4 supplements provided as capsules: placebo (corn oil) or different amounts of an oil providing 1.35, 2.7, or 4.05 g EPA/d for 12 wk. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 12 wk.

RESULTS: EPA was incorporated in a linear dose-response fashion into plasma and mononuclear cell (MNC) phospholipids; incorporation was greater in the older men. EPA treatment did not alter neutrophil or monocyte phagocytosis, monocyte respiratory burst, or the production of inflammatory cytokines by MNCs in the young or older men. EPA treatment caused a dose-dependent decrease in neutrophil respiratory burst only in the older men. Increased incorporation of EPA into plasma or MNC phospholipids was associated with decreased production of prostaglandin E2 by MNCs from both young and older men.

CONCLUSIONS: Older subjects incorporate EPA into plasma and MNC phospholipids more readily than do younger subjects. Other than prostaglandin E2 production, innate immune responses in young subjects are not affected by an EPA intake of < or =4.05 g/d. Older subjects are more sensitive to the immunologic effects of EPA, and the neutrophil respiratory burst is lower at higher EPA intakes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-42
Number of pages12
JournalThe American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume83
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2006

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Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Respiratory Burst
Phospholipids
Neutrophils
Plasma Cells
Dinoprostone
Monocytes
Corn Oil
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Phagocytosis
Double-Blind Method
Innate Immunity
Capsules
Immunity
Oils
Placebos
Cytokines

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aging
  • Analysis of Variance
  • Cytokines
  • Dietary Supplements
  • Dinoprostone
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Eicosapentaenoic Acid
  • Humans
  • Immunity, Innate
  • Leukocytes, Mononuclear
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neutrophils
  • Phagocytosis
  • Phospholipids
  • Respiratory Burst
  • Comparative Study
  • Journal Article
  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Cite this

Dose-related effects of eicosapentaenoic acid on innate immune function in healthy humans : a comparison of young and older men. / Rees, Dinka; Miles, Elizabeth A; Banerjee, Tapati; Wells, Solenne J; Roynette, Catherine E; Wahle, Klaus Wj; Calder, Philip C.

In: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 83, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 331-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rees, Dinka ; Miles, Elizabeth A ; Banerjee, Tapati ; Wells, Solenne J ; Roynette, Catherine E ; Wahle, Klaus Wj ; Calder, Philip C. / Dose-related effects of eicosapentaenoic acid on innate immune function in healthy humans : a comparison of young and older men. In: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2006 ; Vol. 83, No. 2. pp. 331-42.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Increasing intakes of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can decrease markers of immunity. However, dose- and age-related responses have not been identified.OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine the effects of different amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on innate immune outcomes in young and older males.DESIGN: In a controlled, double-blind study, healthy young and older men consumed 1 of 4 supplements provided as capsules: placebo (corn oil) or different amounts of an oil providing 1.35, 2.7, or 4.05 g EPA/d for 12 wk. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 12 wk.RESULTS: EPA was incorporated in a linear dose-response fashion into plasma and mononuclear cell (MNC) phospholipids; incorporation was greater in the older men. EPA treatment did not alter neutrophil or monocyte phagocytosis, monocyte respiratory burst, or the production of inflammatory cytokines by MNCs in the young or older men. EPA treatment caused a dose-dependent decrease in neutrophil respiratory burst only in the older men. Increased incorporation of EPA into plasma or MNC phospholipids was associated with decreased production of prostaglandin E2 by MNCs from both young and older men.CONCLUSIONS: Older subjects incorporate EPA into plasma and MNC phospholipids more readily than do younger subjects. Other than prostaglandin E2 production, innate immune responses in young subjects are not affected by an EPA intake of < or =4.05 g/d. Older subjects are more sensitive to the immunologic effects of EPA, and the neutrophil respiratory burst is lower at higher EPA intakes.",
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T1 - Dose-related effects of eicosapentaenoic acid on innate immune function in healthy humans

T2 - a comparison of young and older men

AU - Rees, Dinka

AU - Miles, Elizabeth A

AU - Banerjee, Tapati

AU - Wells, Solenne J

AU - Roynette, Catherine E

AU - Wahle, Klaus Wj

AU - Calder, Philip C

PY - 2006/2

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Increasing intakes of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can decrease markers of immunity. However, dose- and age-related responses have not been identified.OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine the effects of different amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on innate immune outcomes in young and older males.DESIGN: In a controlled, double-blind study, healthy young and older men consumed 1 of 4 supplements provided as capsules: placebo (corn oil) or different amounts of an oil providing 1.35, 2.7, or 4.05 g EPA/d for 12 wk. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 12 wk.RESULTS: EPA was incorporated in a linear dose-response fashion into plasma and mononuclear cell (MNC) phospholipids; incorporation was greater in the older men. EPA treatment did not alter neutrophil or monocyte phagocytosis, monocyte respiratory burst, or the production of inflammatory cytokines by MNCs in the young or older men. EPA treatment caused a dose-dependent decrease in neutrophil respiratory burst only in the older men. Increased incorporation of EPA into plasma or MNC phospholipids was associated with decreased production of prostaglandin E2 by MNCs from both young and older men.CONCLUSIONS: Older subjects incorporate EPA into plasma and MNC phospholipids more readily than do younger subjects. Other than prostaglandin E2 production, innate immune responses in young subjects are not affected by an EPA intake of < or =4.05 g/d. Older subjects are more sensitive to the immunologic effects of EPA, and the neutrophil respiratory burst is lower at higher EPA intakes.

AB - BACKGROUND: Increasing intakes of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) can decrease markers of immunity. However, dose- and age-related responses have not been identified.OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine the effects of different amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on innate immune outcomes in young and older males.DESIGN: In a controlled, double-blind study, healthy young and older men consumed 1 of 4 supplements provided as capsules: placebo (corn oil) or different amounts of an oil providing 1.35, 2.7, or 4.05 g EPA/d for 12 wk. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 12 wk.RESULTS: EPA was incorporated in a linear dose-response fashion into plasma and mononuclear cell (MNC) phospholipids; incorporation was greater in the older men. EPA treatment did not alter neutrophil or monocyte phagocytosis, monocyte respiratory burst, or the production of inflammatory cytokines by MNCs in the young or older men. EPA treatment caused a dose-dependent decrease in neutrophil respiratory burst only in the older men. Increased incorporation of EPA into plasma or MNC phospholipids was associated with decreased production of prostaglandin E2 by MNCs from both young and older men.CONCLUSIONS: Older subjects incorporate EPA into plasma and MNC phospholipids more readily than do younger subjects. Other than prostaglandin E2 production, innate immune responses in young subjects are not affected by an EPA intake of < or =4.05 g/d. Older subjects are more sensitive to the immunologic effects of EPA, and the neutrophil respiratory burst is lower at higher EPA intakes.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Aging

KW - Analysis of Variance

KW - Cytokines

KW - Dietary Supplements

KW - Dinoprostone

KW - Dose-Response Relationship, Drug

KW - Double-Blind Method

KW - Eicosapentaenoic Acid

KW - Humans

KW - Immunity, Innate

KW - Leukocytes, Mononuclear

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Neutrophils

KW - Phagocytosis

KW - Phospholipids

KW - Respiratory Burst

KW - Comparative Study

KW - Journal Article

KW - Randomized Controlled Trial

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1093/ajcn/83.2.331

DO - 10.1093/ajcn/83.2.331

M3 - Article

C2 - 16469992

VL - 83

SP - 331

EP - 342

JO - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 2

ER -