E. coli and colon cancer: Is mutY a culprit?

Abdul Arif Khan (Corresponding Author), Phillip Cash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recent demonstration of a role of Escherichia coli in the development of invasive carcinoma in mice ushers a new era of bacterial involvement in cancer aetiology. It has been shown previously that the colonic mucosa of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is exclusively colonized by intracellular E. coli instead of extracellular form found in normal colonic mucosa. Surprisingly, the DNA repair gene MUTYH, which is a homologue of the E. coli gene mutY, is responsible for CRC. The current paper discusses the potential role of mutY in CRC aetiology and concludes that research in this area can bring together the diverse threads of the CRC aetiology puzzle.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-131
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Letters
Volume341
Issue number2
Early online date7 Aug 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Colonic Neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms
Escherichia coli
Mucous Membrane
DNA Repair
Genes
Carcinoma
Research
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Escherichia coli
  • Colon Cancer
  • E. coli
  • mut Y
  • MUTYH
  • chronic inflammation
  • carcinogenesis

Cite this

E. coli and colon cancer : Is mutY a culprit? / Khan, Abdul Arif (Corresponding Author); Cash, Phillip.

In: Cancer Letters, Vol. 341, No. 2, 12.2013, p. 127-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khan, Abdul Arif ; Cash, Phillip. / E. coli and colon cancer : Is mutY a culprit?. In: Cancer Letters. 2013 ; Vol. 341, No. 2. pp. 127-131.
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