Early identification of radiographic osteoarthritis of the hip using an active shape model to quantify changes in bone morphometric features

Can hip shape tell us anything about the progression of osteoarthritis?

Jenny Gregory, Jan H. Waarsing, Judd Day, Huibert A. Pols, Max Reijman, Harrie Weinans, Richard Malcolm Aspden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Few methods exist to measure the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) or to identify people at high risk of developing OA. Striking radiographic changes include deformation of the femoral head and osteophyte growth, which are usually measured semiquantitatively following visual assessment. In this study, an active shape model (ASM) of the proximal femur was used to determine whether morphologic changes to the bone could be quantified and used as a marker of hip OA. METHODS: One hundred ten subjects who had no signs of radiographic hip OA at baseline (Kellgren/Lawrence [K/L] scores 0-1) were selected from the Rotterdam Study cohort of subjects ages > or = 55 years. To measure the progression of OA, subjects were followed up with radiographic assessment after 6 years. At the 6-year followup, 55 subjects had established OA (K/L score 3), and in 12 of these OA subjects, the progression of the disease required a total hip replacement (THR). Age- and sex-matched control subjects had a K/L score of 0 at followup. Using the ASM, subjects were assessed for shape changes in the femoral head and neck before, during, and after the development of radiographic OA. Scores of shape variance, or mode scores, were assigned for 10 modes of variation in each subject, and differences in mode scores were determined. RESULTS: During followup, significant changes in shape of the proximal femur occurred within the OA group from baseline to followup (P <0.0001 for mode 1 and P = 0.002 for mode 6) but not within the control group. At baseline (all subjects having K/L scores 0-1), there were significant differences in mode 6 between the OA group and the control group (P = 0.020), and in modes 3 and 6 between the OA subjects who underwent THR and the remaining OA subjects (P = 0.012 and P = 0.019, respectively). CONCLUSION: Compared with traditional scoring methods, the ASM can be used more precisely to quantify the deforming effect of OA on the proximal femur and to identify, at an earlier stage of disease, those subjects at highest risk of developing radiographic OA or needing a THR. The ASM may therefore be useful as an imaging biomarker in the assessment of patients with hip OA.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3634-3643
Number of pages10
JournalArthritis & Rheumatism
Volume56
Issue number11
Early online date29 Oct 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

Fingerprint

Hip Osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis
Hip
Bone and Bones
Hip Replacement Arthroplasties
Femur
Osteophyte
Control Groups
Femur Neck
Thigh
Disease Progression
Cohort Studies
Research Design
Biomarkers

Keywords

  • aged
  • aged, 80 and over
  • disease progression
  • early diagnosis
  • female
  • femur head
  • femur neck
  • follow-up studies
  • hip joint
  • humans
  • male
  • middle aged
  • models, biological
  • models, statistical
  • osteoarthritis, hip
  • osteophyte
  • risk factors

Cite this

@article{0b95d7ec202240dfab580bd26ffc79e2,
title = "Early identification of radiographic osteoarthritis of the hip using an active shape model to quantify changes in bone morphometric features: Can hip shape tell us anything about the progression of osteoarthritis?",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Few methods exist to measure the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) or to identify people at high risk of developing OA. Striking radiographic changes include deformation of the femoral head and osteophyte growth, which are usually measured semiquantitatively following visual assessment. In this study, an active shape model (ASM) of the proximal femur was used to determine whether morphologic changes to the bone could be quantified and used as a marker of hip OA. METHODS: One hundred ten subjects who had no signs of radiographic hip OA at baseline (Kellgren/Lawrence [K/L] scores 0-1) were selected from the Rotterdam Study cohort of subjects ages > or = 55 years. To measure the progression of OA, subjects were followed up with radiographic assessment after 6 years. At the 6-year followup, 55 subjects had established OA (K/L score 3), and in 12 of these OA subjects, the progression of the disease required a total hip replacement (THR). Age- and sex-matched control subjects had a K/L score of 0 at followup. Using the ASM, subjects were assessed for shape changes in the femoral head and neck before, during, and after the development of radiographic OA. Scores of shape variance, or mode scores, were assigned for 10 modes of variation in each subject, and differences in mode scores were determined. RESULTS: During followup, significant changes in shape of the proximal femur occurred within the OA group from baseline to followup (P <0.0001 for mode 1 and P = 0.002 for mode 6) but not within the control group. At baseline (all subjects having K/L scores 0-1), there were significant differences in mode 6 between the OA group and the control group (P = 0.020), and in modes 3 and 6 between the OA subjects who underwent THR and the remaining OA subjects (P = 0.012 and P = 0.019, respectively). CONCLUSION: Compared with traditional scoring methods, the ASM can be used more precisely to quantify the deforming effect of OA on the proximal femur and to identify, at an earlier stage of disease, those subjects at highest risk of developing radiographic OA or needing a THR. The ASM may therefore be useful as an imaging biomarker in the assessment of patients with hip OA.",
keywords = "aged, aged, 80 and over, disease progression, early diagnosis, female, femur head, femur neck, follow-up studies, hip joint, humans, male, middle aged, models, biological, models, statistical, osteoarthritis, hip, osteophyte, risk factors",
author = "Jenny Gregory and Waarsing, {Jan H.} and Judd Day and Pols, {Huibert A.} and Max Reijman and Harrie Weinans and Aspden, {Richard Malcolm}",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1002/art.22982",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "3634--3643",
journal = "Arthritis & Rheumatism",
issn = "0004-3591",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early identification of radiographic osteoarthritis of the hip using an active shape model to quantify changes in bone morphometric features

T2 - Can hip shape tell us anything about the progression of osteoarthritis?

AU - Gregory, Jenny

AU - Waarsing, Jan H.

AU - Day, Judd

AU - Pols, Huibert A.

AU - Reijman, Max

AU - Weinans, Harrie

AU - Aspden, Richard Malcolm

PY - 2007/11

Y1 - 2007/11

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Few methods exist to measure the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) or to identify people at high risk of developing OA. Striking radiographic changes include deformation of the femoral head and osteophyte growth, which are usually measured semiquantitatively following visual assessment. In this study, an active shape model (ASM) of the proximal femur was used to determine whether morphologic changes to the bone could be quantified and used as a marker of hip OA. METHODS: One hundred ten subjects who had no signs of radiographic hip OA at baseline (Kellgren/Lawrence [K/L] scores 0-1) were selected from the Rotterdam Study cohort of subjects ages > or = 55 years. To measure the progression of OA, subjects were followed up with radiographic assessment after 6 years. At the 6-year followup, 55 subjects had established OA (K/L score 3), and in 12 of these OA subjects, the progression of the disease required a total hip replacement (THR). Age- and sex-matched control subjects had a K/L score of 0 at followup. Using the ASM, subjects were assessed for shape changes in the femoral head and neck before, during, and after the development of radiographic OA. Scores of shape variance, or mode scores, were assigned for 10 modes of variation in each subject, and differences in mode scores were determined. RESULTS: During followup, significant changes in shape of the proximal femur occurred within the OA group from baseline to followup (P <0.0001 for mode 1 and P = 0.002 for mode 6) but not within the control group. At baseline (all subjects having K/L scores 0-1), there were significant differences in mode 6 between the OA group and the control group (P = 0.020), and in modes 3 and 6 between the OA subjects who underwent THR and the remaining OA subjects (P = 0.012 and P = 0.019, respectively). CONCLUSION: Compared with traditional scoring methods, the ASM can be used more precisely to quantify the deforming effect of OA on the proximal femur and to identify, at an earlier stage of disease, those subjects at highest risk of developing radiographic OA or needing a THR. The ASM may therefore be useful as an imaging biomarker in the assessment of patients with hip OA.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Few methods exist to measure the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) or to identify people at high risk of developing OA. Striking radiographic changes include deformation of the femoral head and osteophyte growth, which are usually measured semiquantitatively following visual assessment. In this study, an active shape model (ASM) of the proximal femur was used to determine whether morphologic changes to the bone could be quantified and used as a marker of hip OA. METHODS: One hundred ten subjects who had no signs of radiographic hip OA at baseline (Kellgren/Lawrence [K/L] scores 0-1) were selected from the Rotterdam Study cohort of subjects ages > or = 55 years. To measure the progression of OA, subjects were followed up with radiographic assessment after 6 years. At the 6-year followup, 55 subjects had established OA (K/L score 3), and in 12 of these OA subjects, the progression of the disease required a total hip replacement (THR). Age- and sex-matched control subjects had a K/L score of 0 at followup. Using the ASM, subjects were assessed for shape changes in the femoral head and neck before, during, and after the development of radiographic OA. Scores of shape variance, or mode scores, were assigned for 10 modes of variation in each subject, and differences in mode scores were determined. RESULTS: During followup, significant changes in shape of the proximal femur occurred within the OA group from baseline to followup (P <0.0001 for mode 1 and P = 0.002 for mode 6) but not within the control group. At baseline (all subjects having K/L scores 0-1), there were significant differences in mode 6 between the OA group and the control group (P = 0.020), and in modes 3 and 6 between the OA subjects who underwent THR and the remaining OA subjects (P = 0.012 and P = 0.019, respectively). CONCLUSION: Compared with traditional scoring methods, the ASM can be used more precisely to quantify the deforming effect of OA on the proximal femur and to identify, at an earlier stage of disease, those subjects at highest risk of developing radiographic OA or needing a THR. The ASM may therefore be useful as an imaging biomarker in the assessment of patients with hip OA.

KW - aged

KW - aged, 80 and over

KW - disease progression

KW - early diagnosis

KW - female

KW - femur head

KW - femur neck

KW - follow-up studies

KW - hip joint

KW - humans

KW - male

KW - middle aged

KW - models, biological

KW - models, statistical

KW - osteoarthritis, hip

KW - osteophyte

KW - risk factors

U2 - 10.1002/art.22982

DO - 10.1002/art.22982

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 3634

EP - 3643

JO - Arthritis & Rheumatism

JF - Arthritis & Rheumatism

SN - 0004-3591

IS - 11

ER -