Ecology of Problem Individuals and the Efficacy of Selective Wildlife Management

George J. F. Swan, Stephen Redpath, Stuart Bearhop, Robbie McDonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In response to ecological and social drivers, there is a trend towards selective wildlife management that targets the individual rather than the population.

The move towards selectivity in wildlife management is running in parallel with growing recognition of the prevalence and importance of intraspecific variation in ecology and evolution.

As well as being logistically challenging, removing ‘problem individuals’ may inadvertently apply selective pressures on correlated traits (such as sex, size, or social position) that could have indirect, negative impacts on populations.

Social perspectives on ecological outcomes of selective management highlight the importance of interdisciplinary research integrating ecological and social dynamics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)518-530
Number of pages13
JournalTrends in Ecology & Evolution
Volume32
Issue number7
Early online date18 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

Fingerprint

wildlife management
ecology
interdisciplinary research
intraspecific variation
gender
trend
social dynamics

Keywords

  • individual variation
  • predation
  • lethal control
  • conservation conflicts
  • wildlife management

Cite this

Ecology of Problem Individuals and the Efficacy of Selective Wildlife Management. / Swan, George J. F.; Redpath, Stephen; Bearhop, Stuart; McDonald, Robbie.

In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 32, No. 7, 07.2017, p. 518-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Swan, George J. F. ; Redpath, Stephen ; Bearhop, Stuart ; McDonald, Robbie. / Ecology of Problem Individuals and the Efficacy of Selective Wildlife Management. In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 7. pp. 518-530.
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