Effect of early release from intense competition within high density natural regeneration on the properties of the juvenile and mature wood of 40-year-old Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.)

Andrew D Cameron (Corresponding Author), Barry A Gardiner, James Ramsay, Tom A Drewett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

• Context While numerous studies have considered the effects of initial planting spacing on wood properties, little is known about the properties of trees grown from dense natural regeneration and the effects of early release from competition.
• Aims This study examined 40-year-old Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) trees originating from regeneration with an initial density ∼27,000 stems ha−1.
• Methods Treatments were a control of natural regeneration with no interventions and regeneration re-spaced to two metres (height ∼1.6 m). Density and strength measurements were made on the juvenile and mature wood.
• Results No differences were observed in density, modulus of elasticity (MOE) and modulus of rupture (MOR) between the juvenile and mature wood of the control trees. By contrast, the juvenile wood of re-spaced trees was less dense and had a lower MOE than the mature wood.
• Conclusion The control trees revealed a uniformity of properties across the juvenile and mature wood zones, unlike the respaced treatment. Re-spaced trees appear to adapt to their new environment by producing more thin-walled conductive tissue and lowering overall cell wall density that continues from the
juvenile to mature wood. Higher compression wood levels in the control trees are thought to be linked to stem slenderness.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-107
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Forest Science
Volume72
Issue number1
Early online date10 Jul 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Sitka spruce
  • natural regeneration
  • re-spacing

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