Effect of Feeding Habit on Weight in Infancy

Michael De Swiet*, Peter Fayers, Lesley Cooper

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A population study of 758 infants born at the same hospital showed that weight at the ages of six weeks and six months was not significantly related to breast or bottle feeding, the early introduction of solids, or the sodium content of bottle feeds. Weight at six weeks was related to the volume and energy content of the feeds which were examined in those babies that were bottle-fed alone. Although analysis of a single feed showed that mothers mixed feeds incorrectly, there was no evidence that mixing of overstrength feeds leads to obesity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)892-894
Number of pages3
JournalThe Lancet
Volume309
Issue number8017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Apr 1977

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Habits
Bottle Feeding
Weights and Measures
Breast Feeding
Obesity
Sodium
Mothers
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effect of Feeding Habit on Weight in Infancy. / De Swiet, Michael; Fayers, Peter; Cooper, Lesley.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 309, No. 8017, 23.04.1977, p. 892-894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Swiet, Michael ; Fayers, Peter ; Cooper, Lesley. / Effect of Feeding Habit on Weight in Infancy. In: The Lancet. 1977 ; Vol. 309, No. 8017. pp. 892-894.
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