Effect of training on contractile and metabolic properties of wrist extensors in spinal cord-injured individuals

A. Hartkopp, S. D. Harridge, M. Mizuno, Aivaras Ratkevicius, B. Quistorff, M. Kjaer, F. Biering-Sorensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Paretic human muscle rapidly loses strength and oxidative endurance, and electrical stimulation training may partly reverse this, We evaluated the effects of two training protocols on the contractile and metabolic properties of the wrist extensor in 12 C-5/6 tetraplegic individuals. The wrist extensor muscles were stimulated for 30 min/day, 5 days/week, for 12 weeks, using either a high-resistance (Hr) or a low-resistance (Lr) protocol. Total work output was similar in both protocols. The nontrained arm was used as a control. Maximum voluntary torque increased in the Hr (P < 0,05) but not the Lr group. Electrically stimulated peak tetanic torque at 15 Hz, 30 Hz, and 50 Hz were unchanged in the Lr group and tended to increase only at 15 Hz (P < 0.1) in the Hr group, Resistance to fatigue, however, increased (P < 0.05) in both Hr (42%) and Lr (41%) groups. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-NMRS) during and following a continuous 40-s 10-Hz contraction. In the Hr group the cost of contraction decreased by 38% (P < 0.05) and the half-time of phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery was shortened by 52% (P < 0.05). Thus, long-term electrically induced stimulation of the wrist extensor muscles in spinal cord injury (SCI) increases fatigue resistance independent of training pattern. However, only the Hr protocol increased muscle strength and was shown to improve muscle aerobic metabolism after training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-80
Number of pages8
JournalMuscle & nerve
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2003

Keywords

  • electrical stimulation
  • magnetic resonance spectroscopy
  • metabolism
  • muscle
  • spinal cord injury
  • tetraplegia
  • FUNCTIONAL NEUROMUSCULAR STIMULATION
  • ELECTRICAL-STIMULATION
  • SKELETAL-MUSCLE
  • PARAPLEGIC PATIENTS
  • TIBIALIS ANTERIOR
  • PARALYZED MUSCLE
  • FLEXOR MUSCLES
  • HUMAN CALF
  • EXERCISE
  • FATIGUE

Cite this

Hartkopp, A., Harridge, S. D., Mizuno, M., Ratkevicius, A., Quistorff, B., Kjaer, M., & Biering-Sorensen, F. (2003). Effect of training on contractile and metabolic properties of wrist extensors in spinal cord-injured individuals. Muscle & nerve, 27(1), 72-80. https://doi.org/10.1002/mus.10290

Effect of training on contractile and metabolic properties of wrist extensors in spinal cord-injured individuals. / Hartkopp, A.; Harridge, S. D.; Mizuno, M.; Ratkevicius, Aivaras; Quistorff, B.; Kjaer, M.; Biering-Sorensen, F.

In: Muscle & nerve, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 72-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hartkopp, A, Harridge, SD, Mizuno, M, Ratkevicius, A, Quistorff, B, Kjaer, M & Biering-Sorensen, F 2003, 'Effect of training on contractile and metabolic properties of wrist extensors in spinal cord-injured individuals' Muscle & nerve, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 72-80. https://doi.org/10.1002/mus.10290
Hartkopp, A. ; Harridge, S. D. ; Mizuno, M. ; Ratkevicius, Aivaras ; Quistorff, B. ; Kjaer, M. ; Biering-Sorensen, F. / Effect of training on contractile and metabolic properties of wrist extensors in spinal cord-injured individuals. In: Muscle & nerve. 2003 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 72-80.
@article{3fffd2e0d40c40e69b6aee36bbc80c4a,
title = "Effect of training on contractile and metabolic properties of wrist extensors in spinal cord-injured individuals",
abstract = "Paretic human muscle rapidly loses strength and oxidative endurance, and electrical stimulation training may partly reverse this, We evaluated the effects of two training protocols on the contractile and metabolic properties of the wrist extensor in 12 C-5/6 tetraplegic individuals. The wrist extensor muscles were stimulated for 30 min/day, 5 days/week, for 12 weeks, using either a high-resistance (Hr) or a low-resistance (Lr) protocol. Total work output was similar in both protocols. The nontrained arm was used as a control. Maximum voluntary torque increased in the Hr (P < 0,05) but not the Lr group. Electrically stimulated peak tetanic torque at 15 Hz, 30 Hz, and 50 Hz were unchanged in the Lr group and tended to increase only at 15 Hz (P < 0.1) in the Hr group, Resistance to fatigue, however, increased (P < 0.05) in both Hr (42{\%}) and Lr (41{\%}) groups. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-NMRS) during and following a continuous 40-s 10-Hz contraction. In the Hr group the cost of contraction decreased by 38{\%} (P < 0.05) and the half-time of phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery was shortened by 52{\%} (P < 0.05). Thus, long-term electrically induced stimulation of the wrist extensor muscles in spinal cord injury (SCI) increases fatigue resistance independent of training pattern. However, only the Hr protocol increased muscle strength and was shown to improve muscle aerobic metabolism after training.",
keywords = "electrical stimulation, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, metabolism, muscle, spinal cord injury, tetraplegia, FUNCTIONAL NEUROMUSCULAR STIMULATION, ELECTRICAL-STIMULATION, SKELETAL-MUSCLE, PARAPLEGIC PATIENTS, TIBIALIS ANTERIOR, PARALYZED MUSCLE, FLEXOR MUSCLES, HUMAN CALF, EXERCISE, FATIGUE",
author = "A. Hartkopp and Harridge, {S. D.} and M. Mizuno and Aivaras Ratkevicius and B. Quistorff and M. Kjaer and F. Biering-Sorensen",
year = "2003",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1002/mus.10290",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "72--80",
journal = "Muscle & nerve",
issn = "0148-639X",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of training on contractile and metabolic properties of wrist extensors in spinal cord-injured individuals

AU - Hartkopp, A.

AU - Harridge, S. D.

AU - Mizuno, M.

AU - Ratkevicius, Aivaras

AU - Quistorff, B.

AU - Kjaer, M.

AU - Biering-Sorensen, F.

PY - 2003/1

Y1 - 2003/1

N2 - Paretic human muscle rapidly loses strength and oxidative endurance, and electrical stimulation training may partly reverse this, We evaluated the effects of two training protocols on the contractile and metabolic properties of the wrist extensor in 12 C-5/6 tetraplegic individuals. The wrist extensor muscles were stimulated for 30 min/day, 5 days/week, for 12 weeks, using either a high-resistance (Hr) or a low-resistance (Lr) protocol. Total work output was similar in both protocols. The nontrained arm was used as a control. Maximum voluntary torque increased in the Hr (P < 0,05) but not the Lr group. Electrically stimulated peak tetanic torque at 15 Hz, 30 Hz, and 50 Hz were unchanged in the Lr group and tended to increase only at 15 Hz (P < 0.1) in the Hr group, Resistance to fatigue, however, increased (P < 0.05) in both Hr (42%) and Lr (41%) groups. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-NMRS) during and following a continuous 40-s 10-Hz contraction. In the Hr group the cost of contraction decreased by 38% (P < 0.05) and the half-time of phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery was shortened by 52% (P < 0.05). Thus, long-term electrically induced stimulation of the wrist extensor muscles in spinal cord injury (SCI) increases fatigue resistance independent of training pattern. However, only the Hr protocol increased muscle strength and was shown to improve muscle aerobic metabolism after training.

AB - Paretic human muscle rapidly loses strength and oxidative endurance, and electrical stimulation training may partly reverse this, We evaluated the effects of two training protocols on the contractile and metabolic properties of the wrist extensor in 12 C-5/6 tetraplegic individuals. The wrist extensor muscles were stimulated for 30 min/day, 5 days/week, for 12 weeks, using either a high-resistance (Hr) or a low-resistance (Lr) protocol. Total work output was similar in both protocols. The nontrained arm was used as a control. Maximum voluntary torque increased in the Hr (P < 0,05) but not the Lr group. Electrically stimulated peak tetanic torque at 15 Hz, 30 Hz, and 50 Hz were unchanged in the Lr group and tended to increase only at 15 Hz (P < 0.1) in the Hr group, Resistance to fatigue, however, increased (P < 0.05) in both Hr (42%) and Lr (41%) groups. Muscle metabolism was evaluated by P-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-NMRS) during and following a continuous 40-s 10-Hz contraction. In the Hr group the cost of contraction decreased by 38% (P < 0.05) and the half-time of phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery was shortened by 52% (P < 0.05). Thus, long-term electrically induced stimulation of the wrist extensor muscles in spinal cord injury (SCI) increases fatigue resistance independent of training pattern. However, only the Hr protocol increased muscle strength and was shown to improve muscle aerobic metabolism after training.

KW - electrical stimulation

KW - magnetic resonance spectroscopy

KW - metabolism

KW - muscle

KW - spinal cord injury

KW - tetraplegia

KW - FUNCTIONAL NEUROMUSCULAR STIMULATION

KW - ELECTRICAL-STIMULATION

KW - SKELETAL-MUSCLE

KW - PARAPLEGIC PATIENTS

KW - TIBIALIS ANTERIOR

KW - PARALYZED MUSCLE

KW - FLEXOR MUSCLES

KW - HUMAN CALF

KW - EXERCISE

KW - FATIGUE

U2 - 10.1002/mus.10290

DO - 10.1002/mus.10290

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 72

EP - 80

JO - Muscle & nerve

JF - Muscle & nerve

SN - 0148-639X

IS - 1

ER -