Effectiveness of high and low-fidelity simulation-based medical education in teaching cardiac auscultation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Craig Osborne, Craig William Brown, Alyaa Mostafa* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction
Simulation-based medical education (SBME) is an evolving method of teaching cardiac examination skills to healthcare learners. It has been deliberated how effective this teaching modality is and whether high-fidelity methods are more effective than low-fidelity methods. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness of high-fidelity SBME in teaching cardiac auscultation compared to no intervention or another active teaching intervention (low-fidelity SBME) using evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs).
Methods
Literature searches were performed on Medline, Embase, PsychInfo and Cinahl. RCTs that compared the effectiveness of high-fidelity simulation against no intervention or high-fidelity simulation against low-fidelity simulation in teaching cardiac auscultation to healthcare learners were included. Outcomes were knowledge, skills and satisfaction relating to cardiac auscultation education. Data were analysed using Review Manager 5.3 software.
Results
Seventeen RCTs (n=1055) were included. Twelve RCTs (n=692) compared high-fidelity simulation with no intervention. The pooled effect sizes for knowledge and skills were 1.39 (95%CI 0.39–2.38; p=0.006; I2 = 92%) and -0.28 (95%CI -1.49–0.93; p=0.65; I2 = 94%) respectively. Five RCTs (n=363) compared high-fidelity simulation with low-fidelity simulation. The pooled effect sizes for knowledge and skills were -0.73 (95%CI -1.99–0.53; p=0.26; I2 = 86%) and 0.32 (95%CI -0.75–1.39; p=0.56; I2 = 89%) respectively.
Conclusions
This review’s findings suggest that high-fidelity SBME is an effective teaching method for cardiac auscultation education. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in knowledge or skills among learners when comparing high-fidelity simulation to low-fidelity simulation. Further research is needed to establish the effectiveness of different forms of SBME as educational interventions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Healthcare Simulation
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2 Jun 2022

Keywords

  • simulation
  • medical education
  • cardiac auscultation

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