Effects of Chronic Oral Rimonabant Administration on Energy Budgets of Diet-Induced Obese C57BL/6 Mice

Li-Na Zhang, Yuko Gamo, Rachel Sinclair, Sharon E Mitchell, David G Morgan, John C Clapham, John R Speakman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The endocannabinoids have been recognized as an important system involved in the regulation of energy balance. Rimonabant (SR141716), a selective inverse agonist of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), has been shown to cause weight loss. However, its suppressive impact on food intake is transient, indicating a likely additional effect on energy expenditure. To examine the effects of rimonabant on components of energy balance, we administered rimonabant or its vehicle to diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice once daily for 30 days, by oral gavage. Rimonabant induced a persistent weight reduction and a significant decrease in body fatness across all depots. In addition to transiently reduced food intake, rimonabant-treated mice exhibited decreased apparent energy absorption efficiency (AEAE), reduced metabolizable energy intake (MEI), and increased daily energy expenditure (DEE) on days 4-6 of treatment. However, these effects on the energy budget had disappeared by days 22-24 of treatment. No chronic group differences in resting metabolic rate (RMR) or respiratory quotient (RQ) (P > 0.05) were detected. Rimonabant treatment significantly increased daily physical activity (PA) levels both acutely and chronically. The increase in PA was attributed to elevated activity during the light phase but not during the dark phase. Taken together, these data suggested that rimonabant caused a negative energy balance by acting on both energy intake and expenditure. In the short term, the effect included both reduced intake and elevated PA but the chronic effect was only on increased PA expenditure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)954-962
Number of pages9
JournalObesity
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

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rimonabant
Obese Mice
Budgets
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Oral Administration
Diet
Energy Metabolism
Energy Intake
Weight Loss
Eating
Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists
Basal Metabolism
Endocannabinoids
Health Expenditures

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Effects of Chronic Oral Rimonabant Administration on Energy Budgets of Diet-Induced Obese C57BL/6 Mice. / Zhang, Li-Na; Gamo, Yuko; Sinclair, Rachel; Mitchell, Sharon E; Morgan, David G; Clapham, John C; Speakman, John R.

In: Obesity, Vol. 20, No. 5, 05.2012, p. 954-962.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, Li-Na ; Gamo, Yuko ; Sinclair, Rachel ; Mitchell, Sharon E ; Morgan, David G ; Clapham, John C ; Speakman, John R. / Effects of Chronic Oral Rimonabant Administration on Energy Budgets of Diet-Induced Obese C57BL/6 Mice. In: Obesity. 2012 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 954-962.
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