Effects of Community Exercise Therapy on Metabolic, Brain, Physical, and Cognitive Function Following Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

Sarah A Moore, Kate Hallsworth, Djordje G Jakovljevic, Andrew M Blamire, Jiabao He, Gary A Ford, Lynn Rochester, Michael I Trenell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background. Exercise therapy could potentially modify metabolic risk factors and brain physiology alongside improving function post stroke. Objective. To explore the short-term metabolic, brain, cognitive, and functional effects of exercise following stroke. Methods. A total of 40 participants (>50 years, >6 months post stroke, independently mobile) were recruited to a single-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial of community-based exercise (19 weeks, 3 times/wk, "exercise" group) or stretching ("control" group). Primary outcome measures were glucose control and cerebral blood flow. Secondary outcome measures were cardiorespiratory fitness, blood pressure, lipid profile, body composition, cerebral tissue atrophy and regional brain metabolism, and physical and cognitive function. Results. Exercise did not change glucose control (homeostasis model assessment 1·5 ± 0·8 to 1·5 ± 0·7 vs 1·6 ± 0·8 to 1·7 ± 0·7, P = .97; CI = -0·5 to 0·49). Medial temporal lobe tissue blood flow increased with exercise (38 ± 8 to 42 ± 10 mL/100 g/min; P < .05; CI = 9.0 to 0.1) without any change in gray matter tissue volume. There was no change in medial temporal lobe tissue blood flow in the control group (41 ± 8 to 40 ± 7 mL/100 g/min; P = .13; CI = -3.6 to 6.7) but significant gray matter atrophy. Cardiorespiratory fitness, diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, physical function, and cognition also improved with exercise. Conclusion. Exercise therapy improves short-term metabolic, brain, physical, and cognitive function, without changes in glucose control following stroke. The long-term impact of exercise on stroke recurrence, cardiovascular health, and disability should now be explored.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)623-635
Number of pages13
JournalNeurorehabilitation and neural repair
Volume29
Issue number7
Early online date23 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2015

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Exercise Therapy
Cognition
Randomized Controlled Trials
Stroke
Brain
Temporal Lobe
Blood Pressure
Glucose
Atrophy
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Control Groups
Body Composition
HDL Cholesterol
Homeostasis
Myocardial Infarction
Lipids
Recurrence
Health
Cardiorespiratory Fitness

Keywords

  • stroke
  • exercise
  • metabolic risk factors
  • cerebral blood flow
  • physical function
  • cognition

Cite this

Effects of Community Exercise Therapy on Metabolic, Brain, Physical, and Cognitive Function Following Stroke : A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial. / Moore, Sarah A; Hallsworth, Kate; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Blamire, Andrew M; He, Jiabao; Ford, Gary A; Rochester, Lynn; Trenell, Michael I.

In: Neurorehabilitation and neural repair, Vol. 29, No. 7, 08.2015, p. 623-635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moore, Sarah A ; Hallsworth, Kate ; Jakovljevic, Djordje G ; Blamire, Andrew M ; He, Jiabao ; Ford, Gary A ; Rochester, Lynn ; Trenell, Michael I. / Effects of Community Exercise Therapy on Metabolic, Brain, Physical, and Cognitive Function Following Stroke : A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial. In: Neurorehabilitation and neural repair. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 7. pp. 623-635.
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T2 - A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

AU - Moore, Sarah A

AU - Hallsworth, Kate

AU - Jakovljevic, Djordje G

AU - Blamire, Andrew M

AU - He, Jiabao

AU - Ford, Gary A

AU - Rochester, Lynn

AU - Trenell, Michael I

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N2 - Background. Exercise therapy could potentially modify metabolic risk factors and brain physiology alongside improving function post stroke. Objective. To explore the short-term metabolic, brain, cognitive, and functional effects of exercise following stroke. Methods. A total of 40 participants (>50 years, >6 months post stroke, independently mobile) were recruited to a single-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial of community-based exercise (19 weeks, 3 times/wk, "exercise" group) or stretching ("control" group). Primary outcome measures were glucose control and cerebral blood flow. Secondary outcome measures were cardiorespiratory fitness, blood pressure, lipid profile, body composition, cerebral tissue atrophy and regional brain metabolism, and physical and cognitive function. Results. Exercise did not change glucose control (homeostasis model assessment 1·5 ± 0·8 to 1·5 ± 0·7 vs 1·6 ± 0·8 to 1·7 ± 0·7, P = .97; CI = -0·5 to 0·49). Medial temporal lobe tissue blood flow increased with exercise (38 ± 8 to 42 ± 10 mL/100 g/min; P < .05; CI = 9.0 to 0.1) without any change in gray matter tissue volume. There was no change in medial temporal lobe tissue blood flow in the control group (41 ± 8 to 40 ± 7 mL/100 g/min; P = .13; CI = -3.6 to 6.7) but significant gray matter atrophy. Cardiorespiratory fitness, diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, physical function, and cognition also improved with exercise. Conclusion. Exercise therapy improves short-term metabolic, brain, physical, and cognitive function, without changes in glucose control following stroke. The long-term impact of exercise on stroke recurrence, cardiovascular health, and disability should now be explored.

AB - Background. Exercise therapy could potentially modify metabolic risk factors and brain physiology alongside improving function post stroke. Objective. To explore the short-term metabolic, brain, cognitive, and functional effects of exercise following stroke. Methods. A total of 40 participants (>50 years, >6 months post stroke, independently mobile) were recruited to a single-blind, parallel, randomized controlled trial of community-based exercise (19 weeks, 3 times/wk, "exercise" group) or stretching ("control" group). Primary outcome measures were glucose control and cerebral blood flow. Secondary outcome measures were cardiorespiratory fitness, blood pressure, lipid profile, body composition, cerebral tissue atrophy and regional brain metabolism, and physical and cognitive function. Results. Exercise did not change glucose control (homeostasis model assessment 1·5 ± 0·8 to 1·5 ± 0·7 vs 1·6 ± 0·8 to 1·7 ± 0·7, P = .97; CI = -0·5 to 0·49). Medial temporal lobe tissue blood flow increased with exercise (38 ± 8 to 42 ± 10 mL/100 g/min; P < .05; CI = 9.0 to 0.1) without any change in gray matter tissue volume. There was no change in medial temporal lobe tissue blood flow in the control group (41 ± 8 to 40 ± 7 mL/100 g/min; P = .13; CI = -3.6 to 6.7) but significant gray matter atrophy. Cardiorespiratory fitness, diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, physical function, and cognition also improved with exercise. Conclusion. Exercise therapy improves short-term metabolic, brain, physical, and cognitive function, without changes in glucose control following stroke. The long-term impact of exercise on stroke recurrence, cardiovascular health, and disability should now be explored.

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SN - 1552-6844

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ER -