Effects of Exercise in the Cold on Ghrelin, PYY and Food Intake in Overweight Adults

Daniel R Crabtree, Andrew K Blannin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Exercise in cold water has been shown to simulate post-exercise energy intake (EI) in normal-weight individuals. However, the effect of cold exercise on EI in overweight individuals has yet to be examined. The present study investigated the impact of brisk walking in a cold (8˚C) and neutral (20˚C) environment on post-exercise EI and appetite hormone responses.

METHODS: Sixteen overweight participants (10 men, 6 women; age 50.1 ± 11.6 yr, body mass index 28.9 ± 4.2 kg[BULLET OPERATOR]m) completed a 45 min treadmill walk at 8°C and 20°C in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Participants were presented with an ad libitum buffet meal 45 min post-exercise and EI was covertly measured. Skin and rectal temperature were monitored throughout exercise and for 30 min post-exercise, and concentrations of the appetite hormones total ghrelin, acylated ghrelin, and total peptide YY (PYY) were assessed pre- and post-exercise, and pre- and post-meal.

RESULTS: EI was significantly greater following exercise in the cold (1299 ± 657 kcal; mean ± SD) compared with exercise in the neutral environment (1172 ± 537 kcal; mean ± SD) (P < 0.05). The change in the acylated ghrelin concentrations, and the acylated ghrelin AUC values were significantly greater during walking in the cold versus the neutral condition (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION: These findings show that in overweight individuals, exercise in the cold stimulates post-exercise EI to a greater extent than exercise in a neutral environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-57
Number of pages9
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

Fingerprint

Peptide YY
Ghrelin
Eating
Exercise
Energy Intake
Meals
Appetite
Walking
Hormones
Skin Temperature

Keywords

  • Walking
  • Ambient temperature
  • Acylated Ghrelin
  • Total PPY
  • Energy Intake

Cite this

Effects of Exercise in the Cold on Ghrelin, PYY and Food Intake in Overweight Adults. / Crabtree, Daniel R; Blannin, Andrew K.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 47, No. 1, 01.2015, p. 49-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Effects of Exercise in the Cold on Ghrelin, PYY and Food Intake in Overweight Adults",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Exercise in cold water has been shown to simulate post-exercise energy intake (EI) in normal-weight individuals. However, the effect of cold exercise on EI in overweight individuals has yet to be examined. The present study investigated the impact of brisk walking in a cold (8˚C) and neutral (20˚C) environment on post-exercise EI and appetite hormone responses.METHODS: Sixteen overweight participants (10 men, 6 women; age 50.1 ± 11.6 yr, body mass index 28.9 ± 4.2 kg[BULLET OPERATOR]m) completed a 45 min treadmill walk at 8°C and 20°C in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Participants were presented with an ad libitum buffet meal 45 min post-exercise and EI was covertly measured. Skin and rectal temperature were monitored throughout exercise and for 30 min post-exercise, and concentrations of the appetite hormones total ghrelin, acylated ghrelin, and total peptide YY (PYY) were assessed pre- and post-exercise, and pre- and post-meal.RESULTS: EI was significantly greater following exercise in the cold (1299 ± 657 kcal; mean ± SD) compared with exercise in the neutral environment (1172 ± 537 kcal; mean ± SD) (P < 0.05). The change in the acylated ghrelin concentrations, and the acylated ghrelin AUC values were significantly greater during walking in the cold versus the neutral condition (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: These findings show that in overweight individuals, exercise in the cold stimulates post-exercise EI to a greater extent than exercise in a neutral environment.",
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author = "Crabtree, {Daniel R} and Blannin, {Andrew K}",
note = "We thank Dr. Oliver Witard and Dr. Sarah Jackman for their assistance in taking skinfold measurements. We also thank all the volunteers for participating in the study. This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. The authors declare no conflict of interest.",
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N2 - PURPOSE: Exercise in cold water has been shown to simulate post-exercise energy intake (EI) in normal-weight individuals. However, the effect of cold exercise on EI in overweight individuals has yet to be examined. The present study investigated the impact of brisk walking in a cold (8˚C) and neutral (20˚C) environment on post-exercise EI and appetite hormone responses.METHODS: Sixteen overweight participants (10 men, 6 women; age 50.1 ± 11.6 yr, body mass index 28.9 ± 4.2 kg[BULLET OPERATOR]m) completed a 45 min treadmill walk at 8°C and 20°C in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Participants were presented with an ad libitum buffet meal 45 min post-exercise and EI was covertly measured. Skin and rectal temperature were monitored throughout exercise and for 30 min post-exercise, and concentrations of the appetite hormones total ghrelin, acylated ghrelin, and total peptide YY (PYY) were assessed pre- and post-exercise, and pre- and post-meal.RESULTS: EI was significantly greater following exercise in the cold (1299 ± 657 kcal; mean ± SD) compared with exercise in the neutral environment (1172 ± 537 kcal; mean ± SD) (P < 0.05). The change in the acylated ghrelin concentrations, and the acylated ghrelin AUC values were significantly greater during walking in the cold versus the neutral condition (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: These findings show that in overweight individuals, exercise in the cold stimulates post-exercise EI to a greater extent than exercise in a neutral environment.

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