Effects of workplace dietary and/or physical activity interventions targeting healthcare professionals

a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

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Abstract

Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity is high amongst healthcare professionals and there is growing interest in delivering weight loss interventions in the workplace. We conducted a systematic review to (i) examine the effectiveness of workplace-based diet and/or physical activity interventions aimed at healthcare professionals and to (ii) identify and describe key components of effective interventions. Seven electronic databases were systematically searched. Results Thirteen randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria, of which seven had data available for meta-analysis. Where meta-analysis was possible, studies were grouped according to length of follow-up (<12 months and ≥12 months) and behavioural target (diet only, physical activity only or diet and physical activity), with outcome data pooled using a weighted random effects model. Nine studies reported statistically significant (between-group) differences. Four studies reported being informed by a behaviour change theory. Meta-analysis of all trials reporting weight data demonstrated healthcare professionals allocated to dietary and physical activity interventions lost significantly more body weight (−3.95 Kg, [95% CI −4.96 to- 2.95 Kg]) than controls up to 12 months follow up. Conclusions Workplace diet and/or physical activity interventions targeting healthcare professionals are limited in number and are heterogeneous. To improve the evidence base, we recommend additional evaluations of theory-based interventions and adequate reporting of intervention content.
Original languageEnglish
Article number23
JournalBMC Obesity
Volume1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Nov 2014

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Workplace
Randomized Controlled Trials
Diet
Delivery of Health Care
Meta-Analysis
Weight Loss
Research Design
Obesity
Body Weight
Databases
Weights and Measures

Cite this

@article{ce3c291d968a461089f40e5f2f73006f,
title = "Effects of workplace dietary and/or physical activity interventions targeting healthcare professionals: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials",
abstract = "Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity is high amongst healthcare professionals and there is growing interest in delivering weight loss interventions in the workplace. We conducted a systematic review to (i) examine the effectiveness of workplace-based diet and/or physical activity interventions aimed at healthcare professionals and to (ii) identify and describe key components of effective interventions. Seven electronic databases were systematically searched. Results Thirteen randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria, of which seven had data available for meta-analysis. Where meta-analysis was possible, studies were grouped according to length of follow-up (<12 months and ≥12 months) and behavioural target (diet only, physical activity only or diet and physical activity), with outcome data pooled using a weighted random effects model. Nine studies reported statistically significant (between-group) differences. Four studies reported being informed by a behaviour change theory. Meta-analysis of all trials reporting weight data demonstrated healthcare professionals allocated to dietary and physical activity interventions lost significantly more body weight (−3.95 Kg, [95{\%} CI −4.96 to- 2.95 Kg]) than controls up to 12 months follow up. Conclusions Workplace diet and/or physical activity interventions targeting healthcare professionals are limited in number and are heterogeneous. To improve the evidence base, we recommend additional evaluations of theory-based interventions and adequate reporting of intervention content.",
author = "Power, {Brian T} and Kirsty Kiezebrink and Allan, {Julia L} and Campbell, {Marion K}",
note = "Acknowledgements We thank Fiona Stewart for help with designing the search strategy, Rumana Newlands for help with title and abstract screening and Nicola McCleary and Karen Allan for help with data extraction. The authors would also like to thank Alexandra Barratt, Jennifer Hewitt and Susan Racette for providing us with previously unpublished data. This work was funded through a Medical Research Council doctoral training award. The Health Services Research Unit is funded by the Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates. The views expressed are those of the authors alone.",
year = "2014",
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AU - Power, Brian T

AU - Kiezebrink, Kirsty

AU - Allan, Julia L

AU - Campbell, Marion K

N1 - Acknowledgements We thank Fiona Stewart for help with designing the search strategy, Rumana Newlands for help with title and abstract screening and Nicola McCleary and Karen Allan for help with data extraction. The authors would also like to thank Alexandra Barratt, Jennifer Hewitt and Susan Racette for providing us with previously unpublished data. This work was funded through a Medical Research Council doctoral training award. The Health Services Research Unit is funded by the Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates. The views expressed are those of the authors alone.

PY - 2014/11/14

Y1 - 2014/11/14

N2 - Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity is high amongst healthcare professionals and there is growing interest in delivering weight loss interventions in the workplace. We conducted a systematic review to (i) examine the effectiveness of workplace-based diet and/or physical activity interventions aimed at healthcare professionals and to (ii) identify and describe key components of effective interventions. Seven electronic databases were systematically searched. Results Thirteen randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria, of which seven had data available for meta-analysis. Where meta-analysis was possible, studies were grouped according to length of follow-up (<12 months and ≥12 months) and behavioural target (diet only, physical activity only or diet and physical activity), with outcome data pooled using a weighted random effects model. Nine studies reported statistically significant (between-group) differences. Four studies reported being informed by a behaviour change theory. Meta-analysis of all trials reporting weight data demonstrated healthcare professionals allocated to dietary and physical activity interventions lost significantly more body weight (−3.95 Kg, [95% CI −4.96 to- 2.95 Kg]) than controls up to 12 months follow up. Conclusions Workplace diet and/or physical activity interventions targeting healthcare professionals are limited in number and are heterogeneous. To improve the evidence base, we recommend additional evaluations of theory-based interventions and adequate reporting of intervention content.

AB - Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity is high amongst healthcare professionals and there is growing interest in delivering weight loss interventions in the workplace. We conducted a systematic review to (i) examine the effectiveness of workplace-based diet and/or physical activity interventions aimed at healthcare professionals and to (ii) identify and describe key components of effective interventions. Seven electronic databases were systematically searched. Results Thirteen randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria, of which seven had data available for meta-analysis. Where meta-analysis was possible, studies were grouped according to length of follow-up (<12 months and ≥12 months) and behavioural target (diet only, physical activity only or diet and physical activity), with outcome data pooled using a weighted random effects model. Nine studies reported statistically significant (between-group) differences. Four studies reported being informed by a behaviour change theory. Meta-analysis of all trials reporting weight data demonstrated healthcare professionals allocated to dietary and physical activity interventions lost significantly more body weight (−3.95 Kg, [95% CI −4.96 to- 2.95 Kg]) than controls up to 12 months follow up. Conclusions Workplace diet and/or physical activity interventions targeting healthcare professionals are limited in number and are heterogeneous. To improve the evidence base, we recommend additional evaluations of theory-based interventions and adequate reporting of intervention content.

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