Electric field-guided neuron migration: A novel approach in neurogenesis

Li Yao, Abhay Pandit*, Sheng Yao, Colin D. McCaig

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effective directional neuron migration is crucial in development of the central nervous system and for neurogenesis. Endogenous electrical signals are present in many developing systems and crucial cellular behaviors such as neuronal cell division, cell migration, and cell differentiation are all under the influence of such endogenous electrical cues. Preclinical in vivo studies have used electric fields (EFs) to attempt to enhance regrowth of damaged spinal cord axons with some success. Recent evidence shows that small EFs not only guide axonal growth, but also direct the earlier events of neuronal migration and neuronal cell division. This raises the possibility that applied or endogenous EFs, perhaps in combination, may direct transplanted neural stem cells, or regenerating neurons, to the desired site after brain injury or neuron degeneration. The high complexity of both structure and function of the nervous system, however, poses significant challenges to techniques for applying EFs to promote neurogenesis. The evolution of functional biomaterials and nanotechnology may provide promising solutions for the application of EFs in guiding neuron migration and neurogenesis within the central nervous system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-153
Number of pages11
JournalTissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews
Volume17
Issue number3
Early online date2 Mar 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Neurogenesis
Neurons
Electric fields
Neurology
Cell Division
Central Nervous System
Nerve Degeneration
Nanotechnology
Neural Stem Cells
Biocompatible Materials
Brain Injuries
Nervous System
Cell Movement
Cues
Cells
Axons
Cell Differentiation
Spinal Cord
Stem cells
Biomaterials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Electric field-guided neuron migration : A novel approach in neurogenesis. / Yao, Li; Pandit, Abhay; Yao, Sheng; McCaig, Colin D.

In: Tissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.06.2011, p. 143-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0137908f2c734a248e564c5718aff60e,
title = "Electric field-guided neuron migration: A novel approach in neurogenesis",
abstract = "Effective directional neuron migration is crucial in development of the central nervous system and for neurogenesis. Endogenous electrical signals are present in many developing systems and crucial cellular behaviors such as neuronal cell division, cell migration, and cell differentiation are all under the influence of such endogenous electrical cues. Preclinical in vivo studies have used electric fields (EFs) to attempt to enhance regrowth of damaged spinal cord axons with some success. Recent evidence shows that small EFs not only guide axonal growth, but also direct the earlier events of neuronal migration and neuronal cell division. This raises the possibility that applied or endogenous EFs, perhaps in combination, may direct transplanted neural stem cells, or regenerating neurons, to the desired site after brain injury or neuron degeneration. The high complexity of both structure and function of the nervous system, however, poses significant challenges to techniques for applying EFs to promote neurogenesis. The evolution of functional biomaterials and nanotechnology may provide promising solutions for the application of EFs in guiding neuron migration and neurogenesis within the central nervous system.",
author = "Li Yao and Abhay Pandit and Sheng Yao and McCaig, {Colin D.}",
note = "Acknowledgement Science Foundation Ireland-Research Frontiers Program (08/RFP/ENM1218) and the Wellcome Trust. We thank Dr. Francisco Del Monte for technical discussion and Anthony Sloan for editorial assistance.",
year = "2011",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/ten.teb.2010.0561",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "143--153",
journal = "Tissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews",
issn = "1937-3368",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Electric field-guided neuron migration

T2 - A novel approach in neurogenesis

AU - Yao, Li

AU - Pandit, Abhay

AU - Yao, Sheng

AU - McCaig, Colin D.

N1 - Acknowledgement Science Foundation Ireland-Research Frontiers Program (08/RFP/ENM1218) and the Wellcome Trust. We thank Dr. Francisco Del Monte for technical discussion and Anthony Sloan for editorial assistance.

PY - 2011/6/1

Y1 - 2011/6/1

N2 - Effective directional neuron migration is crucial in development of the central nervous system and for neurogenesis. Endogenous electrical signals are present in many developing systems and crucial cellular behaviors such as neuronal cell division, cell migration, and cell differentiation are all under the influence of such endogenous electrical cues. Preclinical in vivo studies have used electric fields (EFs) to attempt to enhance regrowth of damaged spinal cord axons with some success. Recent evidence shows that small EFs not only guide axonal growth, but also direct the earlier events of neuronal migration and neuronal cell division. This raises the possibility that applied or endogenous EFs, perhaps in combination, may direct transplanted neural stem cells, or regenerating neurons, to the desired site after brain injury or neuron degeneration. The high complexity of both structure and function of the nervous system, however, poses significant challenges to techniques for applying EFs to promote neurogenesis. The evolution of functional biomaterials and nanotechnology may provide promising solutions for the application of EFs in guiding neuron migration and neurogenesis within the central nervous system.

AB - Effective directional neuron migration is crucial in development of the central nervous system and for neurogenesis. Endogenous electrical signals are present in many developing systems and crucial cellular behaviors such as neuronal cell division, cell migration, and cell differentiation are all under the influence of such endogenous electrical cues. Preclinical in vivo studies have used electric fields (EFs) to attempt to enhance regrowth of damaged spinal cord axons with some success. Recent evidence shows that small EFs not only guide axonal growth, but also direct the earlier events of neuronal migration and neuronal cell division. This raises the possibility that applied or endogenous EFs, perhaps in combination, may direct transplanted neural stem cells, or regenerating neurons, to the desired site after brain injury or neuron degeneration. The high complexity of both structure and function of the nervous system, however, poses significant challenges to techniques for applying EFs to promote neurogenesis. The evolution of functional biomaterials and nanotechnology may provide promising solutions for the application of EFs in guiding neuron migration and neurogenesis within the central nervous system.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79958245213&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/ten.teb.2010.0561

DO - 10.1089/ten.teb.2010.0561

M3 - Article

C2 - 21275787

AN - SCOPUS:79958245213

VL - 17

SP - 143

EP - 153

JO - Tissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews

JF - Tissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews

SN - 1937-3368

IS - 3

ER -