Element content and daily intake from dietary supplements (nutraceuticals) based on algae, garlic, yeast fish and krill oils—Should consumers be worried?

Andrea Raab, Michael Stiboller, Zuzana Gajdosechova, Jenny Nelson, Jorg Feldmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)
8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The element content of sixty seven food supplements falling into five different categories was determined with an Agilent 8800 Triple Quadrupole ICP-MS and the maximum daily intake calculated. The determined elements were: Rb, Cs, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, V, Cr, Mn, Fe Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, Se, I, Br, B, Al, As, Cd, Sb and Pb. The majority of supplements contained significantly less essential elements than the recommended daily intake. Exceptions were two algae based products leading to a very high iron intake. The use of 3 other algae based products would result in increased iodine intake. Of the non-essential elements determined the intake of inorganic arsenic from all supplements was below the limit set by ANSI 173, but several algae based and one garlic based supplement contained levels of inorganic arsenic above the limit set in China for food supplements. Generally garlic, fish oil and krill oil based products pose little risk of inadvertent increased intake of essential and non-essential elements. Algae based products can lead to intakes above the recommended limits for specific elements and generally contain higher amounts of all elements. None of the tested food supplements poses a direct risk to healthy adults.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-60
Number of pages12
Journal Journal of Food Composition and Analysis
Volume53
Early online date19 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016

Keywords

  • krill oil
  • fish oil
  • essential elements
  • non-essential elements
  • garlic
  • food-supplement
  • algae
  • food composition
  • food analysis

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