Emotion Experience, Expression, and Regulation in Alzheimer's Disease

Julie Diane Henry, Peter G. Rendell, Amanda Scicluna, Michelle Jackson, Louise Helen Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with intact experience but abnormal expression of emotion. Because emotion regulation is important in determining levels of experienced and expressed emotion, individuals with AD and control participants were asked to watch film clips under conditions of spontaneous expression, suppression, or amplification of emotion. Both groups had difficulties with behavioral amplification that were related to performance on a measure of theory of mind. However, intentional use of suppression was intact even for those with AD, consistent with models of aging that regard some emotion control processes as being relatively more automatic in older adulthood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-257
Number of pages6
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

Keywords

  • emotion experience
  • emotion expression
  • emotion regulation
  • abnormal aging
  • facial expression
  • age
  • dementia
  • mind

Cite this

Emotion Experience, Expression, and Regulation in Alzheimer's Disease. / Henry, Julie Diane; Rendell, Peter G.; Scicluna, Amanda; Jackson, Michelle; Phillips, Louise Helen.

In: Psychology and Aging, Vol. 24, No. 1, 03.2009, p. 252-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Henry, Julie Diane ; Rendell, Peter G. ; Scicluna, Amanda ; Jackson, Michelle ; Phillips, Louise Helen. / Emotion Experience, Expression, and Regulation in Alzheimer's Disease. In: Psychology and Aging. 2009 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 252-257.
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