Energetics and litter size variation in domestic dog Canis familiaris breeds of two sizes

M Scantlebury, R Butterwick, J R Speakman

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR), daily energy expenditure (DEE) and metabolisable energy intake (MEI) in two breeds of dog during peak lactation to test whether litter size differences were a likely consequence of allometric variation in energetics. RMR of Labrador retrievers (30 kg, n = 12) and miniature Schnauzers (6 kg, n = 4) averaged 3437 and 1062 kJ/day, respectively. DEE of Labradors (n = 6) and Schnauzers (n = 4) averaged 9808 and 2619 kJ/day, respectively. MEI of Labradors (n = 12) was 22448 kJ/day and of Schnauzers (a = 7) was 5382 kJ/day. DEE of Labrador pups (2.13 kg, n = 19) was 974 kJ/day and Schnauzers (0.89 kg, n = 7) were 490 kJ/day. Although Labradors had higher MEIs than Schnauzers during peak lactation, there was no difference in mass-specific energy expenditure between the two breeds. Hence, it is unlikely that litter size variation is a likely consequence of differences in maternal energy expenditure. Individual offspring were relatively more costly for mothers of the smaller breed to produce. Therefore, litter size variations were consistent with the expectation that smaller offspring should be more costly for mothers, but not that smaller mothers should per se invest more resources in reproduction. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)919-931
Number of pages13
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology
Volume129
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • domestic dog
  • doubly labelled water
  • isotope
  • energetics
  • lactation
  • litter size
  • offspring
  • metabolisable energy intake
  • resting metabolic rate
  • body mass
  • DOUBLY LABELED WATER
  • SUSTAINED METABOLIC-RATE
  • ENERGY-EXPENDITURE
  • CO2 PRODUCTION
  • LACTATING MICE
  • SMALL MAMMALS
  • LIMITS
  • BUDGETS
  • HUMANS
  • BIRDS

Cite this

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title = "Energetics and litter size variation in domestic dog Canis familiaris breeds of two sizes",
abstract = "We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR), daily energy expenditure (DEE) and metabolisable energy intake (MEI) in two breeds of dog during peak lactation to test whether litter size differences were a likely consequence of allometric variation in energetics. RMR of Labrador retrievers (30 kg, n = 12) and miniature Schnauzers (6 kg, n = 4) averaged 3437 and 1062 kJ/day, respectively. DEE of Labradors (n = 6) and Schnauzers (n = 4) averaged 9808 and 2619 kJ/day, respectively. MEI of Labradors (n = 12) was 22448 kJ/day and of Schnauzers (a = 7) was 5382 kJ/day. DEE of Labrador pups (2.13 kg, n = 19) was 974 kJ/day and Schnauzers (0.89 kg, n = 7) were 490 kJ/day. Although Labradors had higher MEIs than Schnauzers during peak lactation, there was no difference in mass-specific energy expenditure between the two breeds. Hence, it is unlikely that litter size variation is a likely consequence of differences in maternal energy expenditure. Individual offspring were relatively more costly for mothers of the smaller breed to produce. Therefore, litter size variations were consistent with the expectation that smaller offspring should be more costly for mothers, but not that smaller mothers should per se invest more resources in reproduction. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "domestic dog, doubly labelled water, isotope, energetics, lactation, litter size, offspring, metabolisable energy intake, resting metabolic rate, body mass, DOUBLY LABELED WATER, SUSTAINED METABOLIC-RATE, ENERGY-EXPENDITURE, CO2 PRODUCTION, LACTATING MICE, SMALL MAMMALS, LIMITS, BUDGETS, HUMANS, BIRDS",
author = "M Scantlebury and R Butterwick and Speakman, {J R}",
year = "2001",
language = "English",
volume = "129",
pages = "919--931",
journal = "Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology",
issn = "1095-6433",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Energetics and litter size variation in domestic dog Canis familiaris breeds of two sizes

AU - Scantlebury, M

AU - Butterwick, R

AU - Speakman, J R

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR), daily energy expenditure (DEE) and metabolisable energy intake (MEI) in two breeds of dog during peak lactation to test whether litter size differences were a likely consequence of allometric variation in energetics. RMR of Labrador retrievers (30 kg, n = 12) and miniature Schnauzers (6 kg, n = 4) averaged 3437 and 1062 kJ/day, respectively. DEE of Labradors (n = 6) and Schnauzers (n = 4) averaged 9808 and 2619 kJ/day, respectively. MEI of Labradors (n = 12) was 22448 kJ/day and of Schnauzers (a = 7) was 5382 kJ/day. DEE of Labrador pups (2.13 kg, n = 19) was 974 kJ/day and Schnauzers (0.89 kg, n = 7) were 490 kJ/day. Although Labradors had higher MEIs than Schnauzers during peak lactation, there was no difference in mass-specific energy expenditure between the two breeds. Hence, it is unlikely that litter size variation is a likely consequence of differences in maternal energy expenditure. Individual offspring were relatively more costly for mothers of the smaller breed to produce. Therefore, litter size variations were consistent with the expectation that smaller offspring should be more costly for mothers, but not that smaller mothers should per se invest more resources in reproduction. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR), daily energy expenditure (DEE) and metabolisable energy intake (MEI) in two breeds of dog during peak lactation to test whether litter size differences were a likely consequence of allometric variation in energetics. RMR of Labrador retrievers (30 kg, n = 12) and miniature Schnauzers (6 kg, n = 4) averaged 3437 and 1062 kJ/day, respectively. DEE of Labradors (n = 6) and Schnauzers (n = 4) averaged 9808 and 2619 kJ/day, respectively. MEI of Labradors (n = 12) was 22448 kJ/day and of Schnauzers (a = 7) was 5382 kJ/day. DEE of Labrador pups (2.13 kg, n = 19) was 974 kJ/day and Schnauzers (0.89 kg, n = 7) were 490 kJ/day. Although Labradors had higher MEIs than Schnauzers during peak lactation, there was no difference in mass-specific energy expenditure between the two breeds. Hence, it is unlikely that litter size variation is a likely consequence of differences in maternal energy expenditure. Individual offspring were relatively more costly for mothers of the smaller breed to produce. Therefore, litter size variations were consistent with the expectation that smaller offspring should be more costly for mothers, but not that smaller mothers should per se invest more resources in reproduction. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

KW - domestic dog

KW - doubly labelled water

KW - isotope

KW - energetics

KW - lactation

KW - litter size

KW - offspring

KW - metabolisable energy intake

KW - resting metabolic rate

KW - body mass

KW - DOUBLY LABELED WATER

KW - SUSTAINED METABOLIC-RATE

KW - ENERGY-EXPENDITURE

KW - CO2 PRODUCTION

KW - LACTATING MICE

KW - SMALL MAMMALS

KW - LIMITS

KW - BUDGETS

KW - HUMANS

KW - BIRDS

M3 - Article

VL - 129

SP - 919

EP - 931

JO - Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology

JF - Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology

SN - 1095-6433

ER -