'Engaged Voices'

The Educational Researchers' Challenge?

Mhairi Catherine Beaton

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    Much has been written about learner identity within schools but fewer studies have explored children’s own perceptions of learner identity. The ethnographic project described in this paper explored the complexity of primary school pupils’ identities (Pollard, 1985). Underpinned by a symbolic interactionist view of identity (Mead, 1934; Blumer, 1969), data collection included observation, video recording of classroom interactions and semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis of these rich data explored the constitution, construction and function of the pupils’ learner identities.
    The project highlighted an issue faced by many educational researchers. As many were once classroom teachers, they may unconsciously bring the assumptions of the classroom teacher to the research process; potentially making it challenging to hear the pupils. The interrelatedness of the various phases of the research and subsequent comparison of the different data, including an insider’s emic conceptual framework through the pupils’ use of ‘flip’ cameras, permitted the researcher in this project to hear the pupils’ authentic voices.
    This permitted the demonstration how the pupils drew from hidden messages conveyed through the structure, culture and organisation of the school to construct their learner identities. Pupils claimed agency in whether they accepted or rejected these messages from their interactions with people and activities in the classroom. The messages identified by the pupils as being used to construct their identity were surprising to the researcher; perhaps in her role as a former classroom teacher.
    The paper concludes with a discussion of resultant implications for those wishing to authentically enact student voice.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 26 Jun 2015
    EventLearner Voice Research Conference - University College, Dublin, Eire, Ireland
    Duration: 26 Jun 201527 Jun 2015

    Conference

    ConferenceLearner Voice Research Conference
    CountryIreland
    CityDublin, Eire
    Period26/06/1527/06/15

    Fingerprint

    pupil
    classroom
    teacher
    primary school pupil
    video recording
    interaction
    research process
    school
    constitution
    interview
    student

    Keywords

    • learner identity
    • student voice
    • authenticity
    • participation

    Cite this

    Beaton, M. C. (2015). 'Engaged Voices': The Educational Researchers' Challenge?. Paper presented at Learner Voice Research Conference, Dublin, Eire, Ireland.

    'Engaged Voices' : The Educational Researchers' Challenge? / Beaton, Mhairi Catherine.

    2015. Paper presented at Learner Voice Research Conference, Dublin, Eire, Ireland.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Beaton, MC 2015, ''Engaged Voices': The Educational Researchers' Challenge?' Paper presented at Learner Voice Research Conference, Dublin, Eire, Ireland, 26/06/15 - 27/06/15, .
    Beaton MC. 'Engaged Voices': The Educational Researchers' Challenge?. 2015. Paper presented at Learner Voice Research Conference, Dublin, Eire, Ireland.
    Beaton, Mhairi Catherine. / 'Engaged Voices' : The Educational Researchers' Challenge?. Paper presented at Learner Voice Research Conference, Dublin, Eire, Ireland.
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