Ethnic identity and intimate partner violence in a New Zealand birth cohort

Dannette Marie, David Fergusson, Joseph Boden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an issue of growing concern in New Zealand, with particular concerns being raised about the over-representation of Maori in surveys of IPV. The present study examined the associations between ethnic identity and IPV in a longitudinal birth cohort of individuals born in Christchurch in 1977. Those participants of Maori identity reported higher rates of both IPV victimisation and perpetration than non-Maori, as well as higher rates of injury related to IPV. Control for a range of socio-economic and family functioning factors reduced the magnitude of the associations between ethnic identity and IPV victimisation, perpetration and injury, but the associations remained substantial. It was concluded that higher rates of IPV among Maori were not explained by cultural factors, and were largely explained by ethnic differences in exposure to socio-economic factors and exposure to family problems in childhood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-145
Number of pages20
JournalSocial Policy Journal of New Zealand
Volume33
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

Fingerprint

ethnic identity
New Zealand
violence
victimization
cultural factors
economic factors
childhood
economics

Cite this

Ethnic identity and intimate partner violence in a New Zealand birth cohort. / Marie, Dannette; Fergusson, David; Boden, Joseph.

In: Social Policy Journal of New Zealand, Vol. 33, 03.2008, p. 126-145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marie, Dannette ; Fergusson, David ; Boden, Joseph. / Ethnic identity and intimate partner violence in a New Zealand birth cohort. In: Social Policy Journal of New Zealand. 2008 ; Vol. 33. pp. 126-145.
@article{3cec3af578ff4cf3a7694c32a44699a4,
title = "Ethnic identity and intimate partner violence in a New Zealand birth cohort",
abstract = "Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an issue of growing concern in New Zealand, with particular concerns being raised about the over-representation of Maori in surveys of IPV. The present study examined the associations between ethnic identity and IPV in a longitudinal birth cohort of individuals born in Christchurch in 1977. Those participants of Maori identity reported higher rates of both IPV victimisation and perpetration than non-Maori, as well as higher rates of injury related to IPV. Control for a range of socio-economic and family functioning factors reduced the magnitude of the associations between ethnic identity and IPV victimisation, perpetration and injury, but the associations remained substantial. It was concluded that higher rates of IPV among Maori were not explained by cultural factors, and were largely explained by ethnic differences in exposure to socio-economic factors and exposure to family problems in childhood.",
author = "Dannette Marie and David Fergusson and Joseph Boden",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "126--145",
journal = "Social Policy Journal of New Zealand",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ethnic identity and intimate partner violence in a New Zealand birth cohort

AU - Marie, Dannette

AU - Fergusson, David

AU - Boden, Joseph

PY - 2008/3

Y1 - 2008/3

N2 - Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an issue of growing concern in New Zealand, with particular concerns being raised about the over-representation of Maori in surveys of IPV. The present study examined the associations between ethnic identity and IPV in a longitudinal birth cohort of individuals born in Christchurch in 1977. Those participants of Maori identity reported higher rates of both IPV victimisation and perpetration than non-Maori, as well as higher rates of injury related to IPV. Control for a range of socio-economic and family functioning factors reduced the magnitude of the associations between ethnic identity and IPV victimisation, perpetration and injury, but the associations remained substantial. It was concluded that higher rates of IPV among Maori were not explained by cultural factors, and were largely explained by ethnic differences in exposure to socio-economic factors and exposure to family problems in childhood.

AB - Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an issue of growing concern in New Zealand, with particular concerns being raised about the over-representation of Maori in surveys of IPV. The present study examined the associations between ethnic identity and IPV in a longitudinal birth cohort of individuals born in Christchurch in 1977. Those participants of Maori identity reported higher rates of both IPV victimisation and perpetration than non-Maori, as well as higher rates of injury related to IPV. Control for a range of socio-economic and family functioning factors reduced the magnitude of the associations between ethnic identity and IPV victimisation, perpetration and injury, but the associations remained substantial. It was concluded that higher rates of IPV among Maori were not explained by cultural factors, and were largely explained by ethnic differences in exposure to socio-economic factors and exposure to family problems in childhood.

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 126

EP - 145

JO - Social Policy Journal of New Zealand

JF - Social Policy Journal of New Zealand

ER -