Ethnicizing Ulster’s Protestants?

Ulster-Scots education in Northern Ireland

Peter Robert Gardner (Corresponding Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Ulster-Scots ethnolinguistic ‘revival,’ often considered to be the ethnic, cultural or linguistic expression of unionism and loyalism, has recently made inroads into schools across Northern Ireland. With intercommunal educational segregation pervasive in the province, the teaching of such an ‘ethnic identity’ has potential sociological ramifications. Utilizing an in-depth textual analysis of the Ulster-Scots Agency’s educational materials and interviews with educationalists and political elites, I contend that although this ethnicization represents a break of sorts with traditional unionist-loyalist ideas rather than an unproblematic reinforcement of them, it holds considerable potential for the deepening of normative senses of communal difference.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-416
Number of pages20
JournalIdentities: Global Studies in Culture and Power
Volume25
Issue number4
Early online date22 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Apr 2018

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political elite
ethnic identity
reinforcement
segregation
ethnicity
linguistics
Teaching
interview
school
education
Education
Northern Ireland
Ulster
Segregation
Ethnolinguistics
Revival
Educationalists
Political Elites
Unionism
Unionists

Keywords

  • ethnicization
  • ethnicity
  • education
  • unionism
  • loyalism

Cite this

Ethnicizing Ulster’s Protestants? Ulster-Scots education in Northern Ireland. / Gardner, Peter Robert (Corresponding Author).

In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Vol. 25, No. 4, 30.04.2018, p. 397-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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