Europeanization of sub-arctic environments: perspectives from Norse Greenland's outer fjords

Kirsty A. Golding, Ian A. Simpson*, Clare A. Wilson, Emily C. Lowe, J. Edward Schofield, Kevin J. Edwards

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Europeanization of sub-Arctic environments by Norse communities in Greenland, from the early 11th to mid 15th centuries AD, varied spatially and temporally, with pastoral agriculture and associated homefield management at the heart of this transformation. This process is poorly understood for the outer fjord areas of Norse Greenland and from this locality we contribute a homefield soils and sediments-based analysis. Our findings identify a recipe effect - the partitioning of turf, domestic animal manure and domestic waste resources used to manage soil fertility, field irrigation channels and the effects of eroded material deposition in the homefield. These management practices increased soil macro-nutrient status relative to pre-settlement concentration in some areas of the homefield whilst macro-nutrient concentrations in other areas of the homefield were allowed to decline. We suggest that where resources were limited, sustainable intensification could only be achieved in some areas of the homefield with other areas managed unsustainably.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-77
Number of pages17
JournalHuman Ecology
Volume43
Issue number1
Early online date18 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2015

Fingerprint

Greenland
arctic environment
Estuaries
Europeanization
Arctic
fjord
Soil
domestic waste
nutrient
resource
soil fertility
Food
manure
management practice
Manure
partitioning
soil
Practice Management
Domestic Animals
irrigation

Keywords

  • Anthrosols
  • Europeanization
  • Norse Greenland
  • Sub-Arctic
  • Sustainable intensification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Ecology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Europeanization of sub-arctic environments : perspectives from Norse Greenland's outer fjords. / Golding, Kirsty A.; Simpson, Ian A.; Wilson, Clare A.; Lowe, Emily C.; Schofield, J. Edward; Edwards, Kevin J.

In: Human Ecology, Vol. 43, No. 1, 02.2015, p. 61-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Golding, Kirsty A. ; Simpson, Ian A. ; Wilson, Clare A. ; Lowe, Emily C. ; Schofield, J. Edward ; Edwards, Kevin J. / Europeanization of sub-arctic environments : perspectives from Norse Greenland's outer fjords. In: Human Ecology. 2015 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 61-77.
@article{a58826f3256343cab512d8c220c7adfc,
title = "Europeanization of sub-arctic environments: perspectives from Norse Greenland's outer fjords",
abstract = "Europeanization of sub-Arctic environments by Norse communities in Greenland, from the early 11th to mid 15th centuries AD, varied spatially and temporally, with pastoral agriculture and associated homefield management at the heart of this transformation. This process is poorly understood for the outer fjord areas of Norse Greenland and from this locality we contribute a homefield soils and sediments-based analysis. Our findings identify a recipe effect - the partitioning of turf, domestic animal manure and domestic waste resources used to manage soil fertility, field irrigation channels and the effects of eroded material deposition in the homefield. These management practices increased soil macro-nutrient status relative to pre-settlement concentration in some areas of the homefield whilst macro-nutrient concentrations in other areas of the homefield were allowed to decline. We suggest that where resources were limited, sustainable intensification could only be achieved in some areas of the homefield with other areas managed unsustainably.",
keywords = "Anthrosols, Europeanization, Norse Greenland, Sub-Arctic, Sustainable intensification",
author = "Golding, {Kirsty A.} and Simpson, {Ian A.} and Wilson, {Clare A.} and Lowe, {Emily C.} and Schofield, {J. Edward} and Edwards, {Kevin J.}",
note = "Acknowledgements The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Leverhulme Trust Footprints on the Edge of Thule Programme Award. ECL acknowledges the support of the Weissman International Internship Program, the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and the Department of Anthropology at Harvard. We would also like to thank George McLeod (University of Stirling) for manufacturing soil thin sections.",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1007/s10745-014-9708-y",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "61--77",
journal = "Human Ecology",
issn = "0300-7839",
publisher = "Springer Science + Business Media",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Europeanization of sub-arctic environments

T2 - perspectives from Norse Greenland's outer fjords

AU - Golding, Kirsty A.

AU - Simpson, Ian A.

AU - Wilson, Clare A.

AU - Lowe, Emily C.

AU - Schofield, J. Edward

AU - Edwards, Kevin J.

N1 - Acknowledgements The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Leverhulme Trust Footprints on the Edge of Thule Programme Award. ECL acknowledges the support of the Weissman International Internship Program, the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and the Department of Anthropology at Harvard. We would also like to thank George McLeod (University of Stirling) for manufacturing soil thin sections.

PY - 2015/2

Y1 - 2015/2

N2 - Europeanization of sub-Arctic environments by Norse communities in Greenland, from the early 11th to mid 15th centuries AD, varied spatially and temporally, with pastoral agriculture and associated homefield management at the heart of this transformation. This process is poorly understood for the outer fjord areas of Norse Greenland and from this locality we contribute a homefield soils and sediments-based analysis. Our findings identify a recipe effect - the partitioning of turf, domestic animal manure and domestic waste resources used to manage soil fertility, field irrigation channels and the effects of eroded material deposition in the homefield. These management practices increased soil macro-nutrient status relative to pre-settlement concentration in some areas of the homefield whilst macro-nutrient concentrations in other areas of the homefield were allowed to decline. We suggest that where resources were limited, sustainable intensification could only be achieved in some areas of the homefield with other areas managed unsustainably.

AB - Europeanization of sub-Arctic environments by Norse communities in Greenland, from the early 11th to mid 15th centuries AD, varied spatially and temporally, with pastoral agriculture and associated homefield management at the heart of this transformation. This process is poorly understood for the outer fjord areas of Norse Greenland and from this locality we contribute a homefield soils and sediments-based analysis. Our findings identify a recipe effect - the partitioning of turf, domestic animal manure and domestic waste resources used to manage soil fertility, field irrigation channels and the effects of eroded material deposition in the homefield. These management practices increased soil macro-nutrient status relative to pre-settlement concentration in some areas of the homefield whilst macro-nutrient concentrations in other areas of the homefield were allowed to decline. We suggest that where resources were limited, sustainable intensification could only be achieved in some areas of the homefield with other areas managed unsustainably.

KW - Anthrosols

KW - Europeanization

KW - Norse Greenland

KW - Sub-Arctic

KW - Sustainable intensification

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84924571286&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10745-014-9708-y

DO - 10.1007/s10745-014-9708-y

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84924571286

VL - 43

SP - 61

EP - 77

JO - Human Ecology

JF - Human Ecology

SN - 0300-7839

IS - 1

ER -