Evaluation of an accident and emergency teleconsultation service for north-east Scotland

E M Brebner, J A Brebner, H Ruddick-Bracken, R Wootton, J Ferguson, A Palombo, D Pedley, A Rowlands, S Fraser

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    21 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We evaluated an accident and emergency teleconsultation service provided to 14 community hospitals in north-east Scotland. Each community hospital was equipped with a videoconferencing system and a document camera to allow transmission of radiographs. The network used 384 kbit/s ISDN connections. A total of 1392 teleconsultations were recorded during a 12-month study period. Seventy-seven per cent of patients (n=1072) were managed locally and 23% (n=320) were transferred to Aberdeen. The majority (95%) of teleconsultations were conducted on weekdays, and 90% of these occurred between the hours of 09:00 and 16:00. The mean delay in contacting a doctor was 9 min and the mean consultation time was 10 min. The majority of patients were suffering from fractures or suspected fractures of the limbs. Radiograph transmission was used in 75% of all teleconsultations. A high degree of satisfaction was recorded by all users of the service.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)16-20
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of telemedicine and telecare
    Volume10
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2004

    Keywords

    • minor injuries telemedicine
    • radiographs
    • support
    • system

    Cite this

    Brebner, E. M., Brebner, J. A., Ruddick-Bracken, H., Wootton, R., Ferguson, J., Palombo, A., ... Fraser, S. (2004). Evaluation of an accident and emergency teleconsultation service for north-east Scotland. Journal of telemedicine and telecare, 10(1), 16-20. https://doi.org/10.1258/135763304322764130

    Evaluation of an accident and emergency teleconsultation service for north-east Scotland. / Brebner, E M; Brebner, J A; Ruddick-Bracken, H; Wootton, R; Ferguson, J; Palombo, A; Pedley, D; Rowlands, A; Fraser, S.

    In: Journal of telemedicine and telecare, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.02.2004, p. 16-20.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Brebner, EM, Brebner, JA, Ruddick-Bracken, H, Wootton, R, Ferguson, J, Palombo, A, Pedley, D, Rowlands, A & Fraser, S 2004, 'Evaluation of an accident and emergency teleconsultation service for north-east Scotland', Journal of telemedicine and telecare, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 16-20. https://doi.org/10.1258/135763304322764130
    Brebner EM, Brebner JA, Ruddick-Bracken H, Wootton R, Ferguson J, Palombo A et al. Evaluation of an accident and emergency teleconsultation service for north-east Scotland. Journal of telemedicine and telecare. 2004 Feb 1;10(1):16-20. https://doi.org/10.1258/135763304322764130
    Brebner, E M ; Brebner, J A ; Ruddick-Bracken, H ; Wootton, R ; Ferguson, J ; Palombo, A ; Pedley, D ; Rowlands, A ; Fraser, S. / Evaluation of an accident and emergency teleconsultation service for north-east Scotland. In: Journal of telemedicine and telecare. 2004 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 16-20.
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