Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on management of pain in older people

Aza Abdulla, Margaret Bone, Nicola Adams, Alison M. Elliott, Derek Jones, Roger Knaggs, Dennis Martin, Elizabeth L. Sampson, Patricia Schofield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pain in older people is not only under-recognised, but is also under-treated. Many professional bodies have documented that pain in this rapidly growing population is poorly controlled [1–7]. This may be related to attitudes and beliefs held by older people, which in turn affects their reporting of pain [8] but also due to misconceptions and educational deficits by health professionals [9, 10]. Treatment when prescribed is often limited to basic medication seldom tailored to the individual [11–14]. There is also a general failure by professionals to consider alternative pain relief options [2]. No doubt more needs to done and national guidance on the management of pain in older people is long overdue.

Older people are different; the bio-physiological changes that occur with ageing, the accumulation of co-morbidities and co-prescription of medication, frailty and psychosocial changes make older people rather unique when considering treatment modalities for pain control.

The British Geriatric Society and British Pain Society have collaborated to produce the first UK guideline on the management of pain in older people. The recommendations follow an extensive systematic review of the available literature and will help health professionals consider the options available when managing pain in older patients.

The guideline has been categorised into sections dealing with pharmacology, interventional therapies, psychological interventions, physical activity and assistive devices and complementary therapies. This article provides a summary of the recommendations. The full guideline is available in the supplement accompanying this issue of the journal.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-153
Number of pages3
JournalAge and Ageing
Volume42
Issue number2
Early online date18 Jan 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

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Evidence-Based Practice
Pain Management
Practice Guidelines
Pain
Guidelines
Self-Help Devices
Health
Complementary Therapies
Geriatrics
Prescriptions
Therapeutics
Pharmacology
Exercise
Psychology
Morbidity
Population

Cite this

Abdulla, A., Bone, M., Adams, N., Elliott, A. M., Jones, D., Knaggs, R., ... Schofield, P. (2013). Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on management of pain in older people. Age and Ageing, 42(2), 151-153. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afs199

Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on management of pain in older people. / Abdulla, Aza; Bone, Margaret; Adams, Nicola; Elliott, Alison M.; Jones, Derek; Knaggs, Roger ; Martin, Dennis; Sampson, Elizabeth L.; Schofield, Patricia.

In: Age and Ageing, Vol. 42, No. 2, 03.2013, p. 151-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdulla, A, Bone, M, Adams, N, Elliott, AM, Jones, D, Knaggs, R, Martin, D, Sampson, EL & Schofield, P 2013, 'Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on management of pain in older people', Age and Ageing, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 151-153. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afs199
Abdulla A, Bone M, Adams N, Elliott AM, Jones D, Knaggs R et al. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on management of pain in older people. Age and Ageing. 2013 Mar;42(2):151-153. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afs199
Abdulla, Aza ; Bone, Margaret ; Adams, Nicola ; Elliott, Alison M. ; Jones, Derek ; Knaggs, Roger ; Martin, Dennis ; Sampson, Elizabeth L. ; Schofield, Patricia. / Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on management of pain in older people. In: Age and Ageing. 2013 ; Vol. 42, No. 2. pp. 151-153.
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