Evidence for infanticide in bottlenose dolphins

An explanation for violent interactions with harbour porpoises?

I. A.P. Patterson, R. J. Reid, B. Wilson, K. Grellier, H. M. Ross, P. M. Thompson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most harbour porpoises found dead on the north-east coast of Scotland show signs of attack by sympatric bottlenose dolphins, but the reason(s) for these violent interactions remain(s) unclear. Post-mortem examinations of stranded bottlenose dolphins indicate that five out of eight young calves from this same area were also killed by bottlenose dolphins. These data, together with direct observations of an aggressive interaction between an adult bottlenose dolphin and a dead bottlenose dolphin calf, provide strong evidence for infanticide in this population. The similarity in the size range of harbour porpoises and dolphin calves that showed signs of attack by bottlenose dolphins suggests that previously reported interspecific interactions could be related to this infanticidal behaviour. These findings appear to provide the first evidence of infanticide in cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises). We suggest that infanticide must be considered as a factor shaping sociality in this and other species of cetaceans, and may have serious consequences for the viability of small populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1167-1170
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume265
Issue number1402
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jul 1998

Fingerprint

Phocoena
Bottle-Nosed Dolphin
Infanticide
infanticide
Phocoena phocoena
porpoise
Tursiops truncatus
dolphin
Ports and harbors
harbor
Dolphins
Coastal zones
calves
dolphins
cetacean
Porpoises
Whales
Phocoenidae
Scotland
whales

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Bottlenose dolphin
  • Cetacea
  • Conservation biology
  • Infanticide
  • Social structure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Evidence for infanticide in bottlenose dolphins : An explanation for violent interactions with harbour porpoises? / Patterson, I. A.P.; Reid, R. J.; Wilson, B.; Grellier, K.; Ross, H. M.; Thompson, P. M.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 265, No. 1402, 07.07.1998, p. 1167-1170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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