Examining the time course of young and older adults' mimicry of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles

Gillian Slessor*, Phoebe E Bailey, Peter G Rendell, Ted Ruffman, Julie D Henry, Lynden K Miles

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electromyographic (EMG) research suggests that implicit mimicry of happy facial expressions remains intact with age. However, age-related differences in EMG responses to enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles have not been explored. The present study assessed younger and older adults' orbicularis oculi (O.oculi; eye) and zygomaticus major (Z.major; cheek) reactions to images of individuals displaying enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles. Both age groups mimicked displays of enjoyment smiles, and there were no age differences in O.oculi and Z.major activity to these expressions. However, compared with younger participants, older adults showed extended O.oculi activity to nonenjoyment smiles. In an explicit ratings task, older adults were also more likely than younger participants to attribute feelings of happiness to individuals displaying both nonenjoyment and enjoyment smiles. However, participants' ratings of the happiness expressed in images of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles were independent of their O.oculi responding to these expressions, suggesting that mimicry and emotion recognition may reflect separate processes. Potential mechanisms underlying these findings, as well as implications for social affiliation in older adulthood, are considered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)532-544
Number of pages11
JournalEmotion
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 May 2014

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Happiness
Young Adult
Emotions
Facial Expression
Cheek
Age Groups
Research

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Electromyography
  • Facial expression mimicry
  • Smiles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Slessor, G., Bailey, P. E., Rendell, P. G., Ruffman, T., Henry, J. D., & Miles, L. K. (2014). Examining the time course of young and older adults' mimicry of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles. Emotion, 14(3), 532-544. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035825

Examining the time course of young and older adults' mimicry of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles. / Slessor, Gillian; Bailey, Phoebe E; Rendell, Peter G; Ruffman, Ted; Henry, Julie D; Miles, Lynden K.

In: Emotion, Vol. 14, No. 3, 05.05.2014, p. 532-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slessor, G, Bailey, PE, Rendell, PG, Ruffman, T, Henry, JD & Miles, LK 2014, 'Examining the time course of young and older adults' mimicry of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles', Emotion, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 532-544. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035825
Slessor G, Bailey PE, Rendell PG, Ruffman T, Henry JD, Miles LK. Examining the time course of young and older adults' mimicry of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles. Emotion. 2014 May 5;14(3):532-544. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035825
Slessor, Gillian ; Bailey, Phoebe E ; Rendell, Peter G ; Ruffman, Ted ; Henry, Julie D ; Miles, Lynden K. / Examining the time course of young and older adults' mimicry of enjoyment and nonenjoyment smiles. In: Emotion. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 532-544.
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