Exhaled nitric oxide during and after heavy exercise in athletes with exercise-induced hypoxaemia

Pascale Kippelen, C. Caillaud, E. Robert, K. Masmoudi, C. Prefaut

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) is an important mediator of vasodilatation, bronchodilatation and lung inflammation. We hypothesised that the exhaled NO level may be modified in some endurance-trained athletes during and after intense exercise. Nine athletes with exercise-induced hypoxaemia (EIH), 12 athletes without EIH and 10 untrained subjects exercised for 15 min at 90% maximal oxygen consumption ((V) over dot O(2)max). Exhaled NO was measured during exercise, and after 1 h and 22 h of recovery. Exhaled NO concentration (C-NO) decreased significantly during exercise in all subjects and returned to basal values after 1 h of recovery with no further modification. Exhaled NO output ((V) over dot (NO)) rose significantly during exercise, rapidly dropped down following exercise and was similar to resting values after 1 h and 22 h of recovery. The results also showed that CNO and (V) over dot (NO) were significantly lower in the athletes with EIH in comparison with the untrained subjects ((V) over dot (NO) was 5.32 +/- 0.77 nmol/min versus 3.61 +/- 0.72 nmol/min at rest, 18.52 +/- 1.50 nmol/min versus 15.00 +/- 2.06 nmol/min during heavy exercise, and 5.52 +/- 1.04 nmol/min versus 3.79 +/- 0.76 nmol/min after 22 h recovery, in untrained subjects and EIH athletes, respectively). These findings do not confirm the hypothesis of pulmonary inflammation associated with EIH. However, potential NO epithelial down-regulation may occur and contribute to the development of gas exchange abnormality in some endurance-trained athletes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)397-404
    Number of pages7
    JournalPflugers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology
    Volume444
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2002

    Keywords

    • endurance-trained athletes
    • pulmonary inflammation
    • ventilation/perfusion mismatch
    • PULMONARY GAS-EXCHANGE
    • CROSS-COUNTRY SKIERS
    • INDUCED HYPOXEMIA
    • AIRWAY INFLAMMATION
    • ARTERIAL HYPOXEMIA
    • EXPIRED AIR
    • VENTILATION
    • HUMANS
    • HISTAMINE
    • METHACHOLINE

    Cite this

    Exhaled nitric oxide during and after heavy exercise in athletes with exercise-induced hypoxaemia. / Kippelen, Pascale; Caillaud, C.; Robert, E.; Masmoudi, K.; Prefaut, C.

    In: Pflugers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology, Vol. 444, No. 3, 06.2002, p. 397-404.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Kippelen, Pascale ; Caillaud, C. ; Robert, E. ; Masmoudi, K. ; Prefaut, C. / Exhaled nitric oxide during and after heavy exercise in athletes with exercise-induced hypoxaemia. In: Pflugers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology. 2002 ; Vol. 444, No. 3. pp. 397-404.
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    abstract = "Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) is an important mediator of vasodilatation, bronchodilatation and lung inflammation. We hypothesised that the exhaled NO level may be modified in some endurance-trained athletes during and after intense exercise. Nine athletes with exercise-induced hypoxaemia (EIH), 12 athletes without EIH and 10 untrained subjects exercised for 15 min at 90{\%} maximal oxygen consumption ((V) over dot O(2)max). Exhaled NO was measured during exercise, and after 1 h and 22 h of recovery. Exhaled NO concentration (C-NO) decreased significantly during exercise in all subjects and returned to basal values after 1 h of recovery with no further modification. Exhaled NO output ((V) over dot (NO)) rose significantly during exercise, rapidly dropped down following exercise and was similar to resting values after 1 h and 22 h of recovery. The results also showed that CNO and (V) over dot (NO) were significantly lower in the athletes with EIH in comparison with the untrained subjects ((V) over dot (NO) was 5.32 +/- 0.77 nmol/min versus 3.61 +/- 0.72 nmol/min at rest, 18.52 +/- 1.50 nmol/min versus 15.00 +/- 2.06 nmol/min during heavy exercise, and 5.52 +/- 1.04 nmol/min versus 3.79 +/- 0.76 nmol/min after 22 h recovery, in untrained subjects and EIH athletes, respectively). These findings do not confirm the hypothesis of pulmonary inflammation associated with EIH. However, potential NO epithelial down-regulation may occur and contribute to the development of gas exchange abnormality in some endurance-trained athletes.",
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    T1 - Exhaled nitric oxide during and after heavy exercise in athletes with exercise-induced hypoxaemia

    AU - Kippelen, Pascale

    AU - Caillaud, C.

    AU - Robert, E.

    AU - Masmoudi, K.

    AU - Prefaut, C.

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    N2 - Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) is an important mediator of vasodilatation, bronchodilatation and lung inflammation. We hypothesised that the exhaled NO level may be modified in some endurance-trained athletes during and after intense exercise. Nine athletes with exercise-induced hypoxaemia (EIH), 12 athletes without EIH and 10 untrained subjects exercised for 15 min at 90% maximal oxygen consumption ((V) over dot O(2)max). Exhaled NO was measured during exercise, and after 1 h and 22 h of recovery. Exhaled NO concentration (C-NO) decreased significantly during exercise in all subjects and returned to basal values after 1 h of recovery with no further modification. Exhaled NO output ((V) over dot (NO)) rose significantly during exercise, rapidly dropped down following exercise and was similar to resting values after 1 h and 22 h of recovery. The results also showed that CNO and (V) over dot (NO) were significantly lower in the athletes with EIH in comparison with the untrained subjects ((V) over dot (NO) was 5.32 +/- 0.77 nmol/min versus 3.61 +/- 0.72 nmol/min at rest, 18.52 +/- 1.50 nmol/min versus 15.00 +/- 2.06 nmol/min during heavy exercise, and 5.52 +/- 1.04 nmol/min versus 3.79 +/- 0.76 nmol/min after 22 h recovery, in untrained subjects and EIH athletes, respectively). These findings do not confirm the hypothesis of pulmonary inflammation associated with EIH. However, potential NO epithelial down-regulation may occur and contribute to the development of gas exchange abnormality in some endurance-trained athletes.

    AB - Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) is an important mediator of vasodilatation, bronchodilatation and lung inflammation. We hypothesised that the exhaled NO level may be modified in some endurance-trained athletes during and after intense exercise. Nine athletes with exercise-induced hypoxaemia (EIH), 12 athletes without EIH and 10 untrained subjects exercised for 15 min at 90% maximal oxygen consumption ((V) over dot O(2)max). Exhaled NO was measured during exercise, and after 1 h and 22 h of recovery. Exhaled NO concentration (C-NO) decreased significantly during exercise in all subjects and returned to basal values after 1 h of recovery with no further modification. Exhaled NO output ((V) over dot (NO)) rose significantly during exercise, rapidly dropped down following exercise and was similar to resting values after 1 h and 22 h of recovery. The results also showed that CNO and (V) over dot (NO) were significantly lower in the athletes with EIH in comparison with the untrained subjects ((V) over dot (NO) was 5.32 +/- 0.77 nmol/min versus 3.61 +/- 0.72 nmol/min at rest, 18.52 +/- 1.50 nmol/min versus 15.00 +/- 2.06 nmol/min during heavy exercise, and 5.52 +/- 1.04 nmol/min versus 3.79 +/- 0.76 nmol/min after 22 h recovery, in untrained subjects and EIH athletes, respectively). These findings do not confirm the hypothesis of pulmonary inflammation associated with EIH. However, potential NO epithelial down-regulation may occur and contribute to the development of gas exchange abnormality in some endurance-trained athletes.

    KW - endurance-trained athletes

    KW - pulmonary inflammation

    KW - ventilation/perfusion mismatch

    KW - PULMONARY GAS-EXCHANGE

    KW - CROSS-COUNTRY SKIERS

    KW - INDUCED HYPOXEMIA

    KW - AIRWAY INFLAMMATION

    KW - ARTERIAL HYPOXEMIA

    KW - EXPIRED AIR

    KW - VENTILATION

    KW - HUMANS

    KW - HISTAMINE

    KW - METHACHOLINE

    U2 - 10.1007/s00424-002-0816-y

    DO - 10.1007/s00424-002-0816-y

    M3 - Article

    VL - 444

    SP - 397

    EP - 404

    JO - Pflugers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology

    JF - Pflugers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology

    SN - 0031-6768

    IS - 3

    ER -