Exploring the relationship between maternal body mass index and offspring birth weight

Analysis of routinely collected data from 1967 to 2010 in Aberdeen, Scotland

A. J. Brewster, V. Hardock, S. Bhattacharya*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to assess the relationship between maternal body mass index (BMI) and neonatal birth weight. Data were extracted from Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank on all deliveries (n = 94049) occurring between 1967 and 2010. Compared with mothers whose weight was in the normal range, the adjusted odds of delivering a high-birth-weight infant were 0.63 (95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.67), 1.44 (1.39, 1.50); 1.83 (1.72, 1.95); 2.22 (2.04, 2.43) in underweight, overweight, obese and morbidly obese mothers, respectively. Similarly, the adjusted odds of delivering a low-birth-weight baby decreased with increasing maternal BMI from 1.38 (1.23, 1.55) in underweight women to 0.80 (0.72, 0.89) in overweight women; 0.78 (0.67, 0.93) in obese and 0.56 (0.44, 0.71) in morbidly obese mothers. These relationships were only evident after adjustment for gestational age, presumably because higher maternal BMI is also, in some cases, associated with pre-term deliveries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)810-816
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume35
Issue number8
Early online date15 Jun 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Nov 2015

Fingerprint

Scotland
Birth Weight
Body Mass Index
Mothers
Thinness
Low Birth Weight Infant
Gestational Age
Reference Values
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Databases
Confidence Intervals
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Birth weight
  • maternal body mass index
  • obese
  • overweight
  • underweight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

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title = "Exploring the relationship between maternal body mass index and offspring birth weight: Analysis of routinely collected data from 1967 to 2010 in Aberdeen, Scotland",
abstract = "A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to assess the relationship between maternal body mass index (BMI) and neonatal birth weight. Data were extracted from Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank on all deliveries (n = 94049) occurring between 1967 and 2010. Compared with mothers whose weight was in the normal range, the adjusted odds of delivering a high-birth-weight infant were 0.63 (95{\%} confidence interval: 0.59, 0.67), 1.44 (1.39, 1.50); 1.83 (1.72, 1.95); 2.22 (2.04, 2.43) in underweight, overweight, obese and morbidly obese mothers, respectively. Similarly, the adjusted odds of delivering a low-birth-weight baby decreased with increasing maternal BMI from 1.38 (1.23, 1.55) in underweight women to 0.80 (0.72, 0.89) in overweight women; 0.78 (0.67, 0.93) in obese and 0.56 (0.44, 0.71) in morbidly obese mothers. These relationships were only evident after adjustment for gestational age, presumably because higher maternal BMI is also, in some cases, associated with pre-term deliveries.",
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author = "Brewster, {A. J.} and V. Hardock and S. Bhattacharya",
note = "The authors would like to thank Ms Katie Wilde, Data Management Team, University of Aberdeen for extracting data from the AMND. Viktor Hardock performed this analysis as a visiting student at the University of Aberdeen from the University of Bremen as part of the Erasmus internship scheme.",
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N2 - A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to assess the relationship between maternal body mass index (BMI) and neonatal birth weight. Data were extracted from Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank on all deliveries (n = 94049) occurring between 1967 and 2010. Compared with mothers whose weight was in the normal range, the adjusted odds of delivering a high-birth-weight infant were 0.63 (95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.67), 1.44 (1.39, 1.50); 1.83 (1.72, 1.95); 2.22 (2.04, 2.43) in underweight, overweight, obese and morbidly obese mothers, respectively. Similarly, the adjusted odds of delivering a low-birth-weight baby decreased with increasing maternal BMI from 1.38 (1.23, 1.55) in underweight women to 0.80 (0.72, 0.89) in overweight women; 0.78 (0.67, 0.93) in obese and 0.56 (0.44, 0.71) in morbidly obese mothers. These relationships were only evident after adjustment for gestational age, presumably because higher maternal BMI is also, in some cases, associated with pre-term deliveries.

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