Eye movements while judging faces for trustworthiness and dominance

Frouke Hermens (Corresponding Author), Marius Golubickis, C Neil Macrae

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Abstract

Past studies examining how people judge faces for trustworthiness and dominance have suggested that they use particular facial features (e.g. mouth features for trustworthiness, eyebrow and cheek features for dominance ratings) to complete the task. Here, we examine whether eye movements during the task reflect the importance of these features. We here compared eye movements for trustworthiness and dominance ratings of face images under three stimulus configurations: Small images (mimicking large viewing distances), large images (mimicking face to face viewing), and a moving window condition (removing extrafoveal information). Whereas first area fixated, dwell times, and number of fixations depended on the size of the stimuli and the availability of extrafoveal vision, and varied substantially across participants, no clear task differences were found. These results indicate that gaze patterns for face stimuli are highly individual, do not vary between trustworthiness and dominance ratings, but are influenced by the size of the stimuli and the availability of extrafoveal vision.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere5702
JournalPeerJ
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Oct 2018

Keywords

  • eye movements
  • social judgements
  • face perception

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