Farnesol and geranylgeraniol prevent activation of caspases by aminobisphosphonates: Biochemical evidence for two distinct pharmacological classes of bisphosphonate drugs

H L Benford, J C Frith, S Auriola, J Monkkonen, M J Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

231 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, advances have been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which bisphosphonate drugs inhibit bone resorption. Studies with the macrophage-like cell line J774 have suggested that alendronate, an amino-containing bisphosphonate, causes apoptosis by preventing post-translational modification of GTP-binding proteins with isoprenoid lipids. However, clodronate, a nonaminobisphosphonate, does not inhibit protein isoprenylation but can be metabolized intracellularly to a cytotoxic, beta-gamma-methylene (AppCp-type) analog of ATP. These observations raise the possibility that bisphosphonates can be divided into two groups with distinct molecular mechanisms of action depending on the nature of the R-2 side chain. We addressed this question by directly comparing the ability of three aminobisphosphonates (alendronate, ibandronate, and pamidronate) and three nonaminobisphosphonates (clodronate, etidronate, and tiludronate) to inhibit protein isoprenylation and activate caspase-3-like proteases or to be metabolized to AppCp-type nucleotides by J774 cells. All three aminobisphosphonates inhibited protein isoprenylation and activated caspase-3-like proteases. Apoptosis and caspase activation after 24-h treatment with the aminobisphosphonates could be prevented by addition of famesol or geranylgeraniol, confirming that these bisphosphonates inhibit the metabolic mevalonate pathway. No AppCp-type metabolites of the aminobisphosphonates could be detected by mass spectrometry. The three nonaminobisphosphonates did not inhibit protein isoprenylation or cause activation of caspase-3-like proteases, but were incorporated into AppCp-type nucleotides. Taken together, these observations clearly demonstrate that bisphosphonate drugs can be divided into two pharmacological classes: the aminobisphosphonates, which act by inhibiting protein isoprenylation, and the less potent nonaminobisphosphonates, which act through the intracellular accumulation of AppCp-type metabolites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-140
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular Pharmacology
Volume56
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Keywords

  • CELLS IN-VITRO
  • MOLD DICTYOSTELIUM-DISCOIDEUM
  • GTP-BINDING PROTEIN
  • BONE-RESORPTION
  • MACROPHAGE-LIKE
  • OSTEOCLAST PRECURSORS
  • ADENINE-NUCLEOTIDES
  • RAT BONE
  • APOPTOSIS
  • GROWTH

Cite this

Farnesol and geranylgeraniol prevent activation of caspases by aminobisphosphonates: Biochemical evidence for two distinct pharmacological classes of bisphosphonate drugs. / Benford, H L ; Frith, J C ; Auriola, S ; Monkkonen, J ; Rogers, M J .

In: Molecular Pharmacology, Vol. 56, 1999, p. 131-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Recently, advances have been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which bisphosphonate drugs inhibit bone resorption. Studies with the macrophage-like cell line J774 have suggested that alendronate, an amino-containing bisphosphonate, causes apoptosis by preventing post-translational modification of GTP-binding proteins with isoprenoid lipids. However, clodronate, a nonaminobisphosphonate, does not inhibit protein isoprenylation but can be metabolized intracellularly to a cytotoxic, beta-gamma-methylene (AppCp-type) analog of ATP. These observations raise the possibility that bisphosphonates can be divided into two groups with distinct molecular mechanisms of action depending on the nature of the R-2 side chain. We addressed this question by directly comparing the ability of three aminobisphosphonates (alendronate, ibandronate, and pamidronate) and three nonaminobisphosphonates (clodronate, etidronate, and tiludronate) to inhibit protein isoprenylation and activate caspase-3-like proteases or to be metabolized to AppCp-type nucleotides by J774 cells. All three aminobisphosphonates inhibited protein isoprenylation and activated caspase-3-like proteases. Apoptosis and caspase activation after 24-h treatment with the aminobisphosphonates could be prevented by addition of famesol or geranylgeraniol, confirming that these bisphosphonates inhibit the metabolic mevalonate pathway. No AppCp-type metabolites of the aminobisphosphonates could be detected by mass spectrometry. The three nonaminobisphosphonates did not inhibit protein isoprenylation or cause activation of caspase-3-like proteases, but were incorporated into AppCp-type nucleotides. Taken together, these observations clearly demonstrate that bisphosphonate drugs can be divided into two pharmacological classes: the aminobisphosphonates, which act by inhibiting protein isoprenylation, and the less potent nonaminobisphosphonates, which act through the intracellular accumulation of AppCp-type metabolites.",
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T1 - Farnesol and geranylgeraniol prevent activation of caspases by aminobisphosphonates: Biochemical evidence for two distinct pharmacological classes of bisphosphonate drugs

AU - Benford, H L

AU - Frith, J C

AU - Auriola, S

AU - Monkkonen, J

AU - Rogers, M J

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - Recently, advances have been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which bisphosphonate drugs inhibit bone resorption. Studies with the macrophage-like cell line J774 have suggested that alendronate, an amino-containing bisphosphonate, causes apoptosis by preventing post-translational modification of GTP-binding proteins with isoprenoid lipids. However, clodronate, a nonaminobisphosphonate, does not inhibit protein isoprenylation but can be metabolized intracellularly to a cytotoxic, beta-gamma-methylene (AppCp-type) analog of ATP. These observations raise the possibility that bisphosphonates can be divided into two groups with distinct molecular mechanisms of action depending on the nature of the R-2 side chain. We addressed this question by directly comparing the ability of three aminobisphosphonates (alendronate, ibandronate, and pamidronate) and three nonaminobisphosphonates (clodronate, etidronate, and tiludronate) to inhibit protein isoprenylation and activate caspase-3-like proteases or to be metabolized to AppCp-type nucleotides by J774 cells. All three aminobisphosphonates inhibited protein isoprenylation and activated caspase-3-like proteases. Apoptosis and caspase activation after 24-h treatment with the aminobisphosphonates could be prevented by addition of famesol or geranylgeraniol, confirming that these bisphosphonates inhibit the metabolic mevalonate pathway. No AppCp-type metabolites of the aminobisphosphonates could be detected by mass spectrometry. The three nonaminobisphosphonates did not inhibit protein isoprenylation or cause activation of caspase-3-like proteases, but were incorporated into AppCp-type nucleotides. Taken together, these observations clearly demonstrate that bisphosphonate drugs can be divided into two pharmacological classes: the aminobisphosphonates, which act by inhibiting protein isoprenylation, and the less potent nonaminobisphosphonates, which act through the intracellular accumulation of AppCp-type metabolites.

AB - Recently, advances have been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which bisphosphonate drugs inhibit bone resorption. Studies with the macrophage-like cell line J774 have suggested that alendronate, an amino-containing bisphosphonate, causes apoptosis by preventing post-translational modification of GTP-binding proteins with isoprenoid lipids. However, clodronate, a nonaminobisphosphonate, does not inhibit protein isoprenylation but can be metabolized intracellularly to a cytotoxic, beta-gamma-methylene (AppCp-type) analog of ATP. These observations raise the possibility that bisphosphonates can be divided into two groups with distinct molecular mechanisms of action depending on the nature of the R-2 side chain. We addressed this question by directly comparing the ability of three aminobisphosphonates (alendronate, ibandronate, and pamidronate) and three nonaminobisphosphonates (clodronate, etidronate, and tiludronate) to inhibit protein isoprenylation and activate caspase-3-like proteases or to be metabolized to AppCp-type nucleotides by J774 cells. All three aminobisphosphonates inhibited protein isoprenylation and activated caspase-3-like proteases. Apoptosis and caspase activation after 24-h treatment with the aminobisphosphonates could be prevented by addition of famesol or geranylgeraniol, confirming that these bisphosphonates inhibit the metabolic mevalonate pathway. No AppCp-type metabolites of the aminobisphosphonates could be detected by mass spectrometry. The three nonaminobisphosphonates did not inhibit protein isoprenylation or cause activation of caspase-3-like proteases, but were incorporated into AppCp-type nucleotides. Taken together, these observations clearly demonstrate that bisphosphonate drugs can be divided into two pharmacological classes: the aminobisphosphonates, which act by inhibiting protein isoprenylation, and the less potent nonaminobisphosphonates, which act through the intracellular accumulation of AppCp-type metabolites.

KW - CELLS IN-VITRO

KW - MOLD DICTYOSTELIUM-DISCOIDEUM

KW - GTP-BINDING PROTEIN

KW - BONE-RESORPTION

KW - MACROPHAGE-LIKE

KW - OSTEOCLAST PRECURSORS

KW - ADENINE-NUCLEOTIDES

KW - RAT BONE

KW - APOPTOSIS

KW - GROWTH

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 131

EP - 140

JO - Molecular Pharmacology

JF - Molecular Pharmacology

SN - 0026-895X

ER -