Fibre intake, constipation and risk of varicose veins in the general population

Amanda Jane Lee, C. J. Evans, C. M. Hau, F. G. Fowkes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between fiber intake, constipation, and clinical venous disease in the general population The Edinburgh Vein Study was comprised of 1566 men and women aged 1864 years who were selected at random from the age-sex registers of 12 general practices. Fiber intake, intestinal transit time, defecation frequency and the prevalence of straining at stool were all found to be significantly different between the sexes. Men who reported that they strained to start passing a motion showed a higher prevalence of mild and severe trunk varices compared to men who did not strain. After adjustment for social class, BMI and mobility at work, this group of men showed a significantly elevated risk of having severe trunk varices (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.16, 6.58). In contrast, no consistent relationships were seen among women. Overall, within this Western general population, an association between dietary fiber, constipation and the presence or severity of varicose veins was not supported. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-429
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume54
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • varicose veins
  • fiber intake
  • constipation
  • epidemiology
  • CHRONIC VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY
  • TRANSIT-TIME
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • PREVALENCE
  • DEFECATION
  • DISEASE

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