Fibrofog in daily life: An examination of ambulatory subjective and objective cognitive function in fibromyalgia

Anna L. Kratz*, Daniel Whibley, Samsuk Kim, Martin Sliwinski, Daniel Clauw, David A. Williams

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective
Perceived cognitive dysfunction in fibromyalgia (FM), “fibrofog,” is common. Prior laboratory‐based studies have limited our understanding of cognitive function in FM in daily life. The aim of this study is to explore levels of subjective and objective cognitive functioning and the association between subjective and objective aspects of cognition in persons with and without FM in the lived environment.

Methods
Participants (n=50 adults with FM; n= 50 adults without FM matched on age, sex, and education) completed baseline measures of subjective and objective (NIH Toolbox) cognitive functioning. Then, they completed ecological momentary assessments of cognitive clarity and speed and tests of processing speed and working memory, via a smart phone app, 5X/day for 8 days.

Results
On baseline objective measures, the FM group demonstrated poorer cognitive functioning across three NIH Toolbox tests. There were no strong correlations between subjective and objective cognitive functioning in both the FM and control group. In the lived environment, the FM group demonstrated poorer subjective cognition and objective working memory; groups did not differ on processing speed. Momentary ratings of subjective cognitive dysfunction were significantly related to changes in objective processing speed but not working memory, with no group differences.

Conclusion
Findings indicate worse lab‐based and ambulatory subjective and objective cognitive function for those with FM compared to those without FM. Similar associations between measures of subjective and objective cognitive functioning for the groups suggest that people with FM are not overstating cognitive difficulties. Future research examining contributors to ambulatory fibrofog is warranted.
Original languageEnglish
JournalArthritis Care & Research
Early online date14 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Oct 2019

Fingerprint

Fibromyalgia
Cognition
Short-Term Memory
Sex Education

Keywords

  • fibromyalgia
  • cognitive dysfunction
  • fibrofog
  • ambulatory assessment
  • working memory,
  • processing speed

Cite this

Fibrofog in daily life : An examination of ambulatory subjective and objective cognitive function in fibromyalgia. / Kratz, Anna L.; Whibley, Daniel; Kim, Samsuk; Sliwinski, Martin; Clauw, Daniel; Williams, David A.

In: Arthritis Care & Research, 14.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e09528c7583a4f5fade09ceea742519d,
title = "Fibrofog in daily life: An examination of ambulatory subjective and objective cognitive function in fibromyalgia",
abstract = "ObjectivePerceived cognitive dysfunction in fibromyalgia (FM), “fibrofog,” is common. Prior laboratory‐based studies have limited our understanding of cognitive function in FM in daily life. The aim of this study is to explore levels of subjective and objective cognitive functioning and the association between subjective and objective aspects of cognition in persons with and without FM in the lived environment.MethodsParticipants (n=50 adults with FM; n= 50 adults without FM matched on age, sex, and education) completed baseline measures of subjective and objective (NIH Toolbox) cognitive functioning. Then, they completed ecological momentary assessments of cognitive clarity and speed and tests of processing speed and working memory, via a smart phone app, 5X/day for 8 days.ResultsOn baseline objective measures, the FM group demonstrated poorer cognitive functioning across three NIH Toolbox tests. There were no strong correlations between subjective and objective cognitive functioning in both the FM and control group. In the lived environment, the FM group demonstrated poorer subjective cognition and objective working memory; groups did not differ on processing speed. Momentary ratings of subjective cognitive dysfunction were significantly related to changes in objective processing speed but not working memory, with no group differences.ConclusionFindings indicate worse lab‐based and ambulatory subjective and objective cognitive function for those with FM compared to those without FM. Similar associations between measures of subjective and objective cognitive functioning for the groups suggest that people with FM are not overstating cognitive difficulties. Future research examining contributors to ambulatory fibrofog is warranted.",
keywords = "fibromyalgia, cognitive dysfunction, fibrofog, ambulatory assessment, working memory,, processing speed",
author = "Kratz, {Anna L.} and Daniel Whibley and Samsuk Kim and Martin Sliwinski and Daniel Clauw and Williams, {David A.}",
note = "Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (award number K01AR064275; PI: Kratz). The Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR: NIH award number UL1TR002240) provided subject recruitment support through the UMHealthResearch.org website. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1002/acr.24089",
language = "English",
journal = "Arthritis Care & Research",
issn = "0893-7524",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fibrofog in daily life

T2 - An examination of ambulatory subjective and objective cognitive function in fibromyalgia

AU - Kratz, Anna L.

AU - Whibley, Daniel

AU - Kim, Samsuk

AU - Sliwinski, Martin

AU - Clauw, Daniel

AU - Williams, David A.

N1 - Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (award number K01AR064275; PI: Kratz). The Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR: NIH award number UL1TR002240) provided subject recruitment support through the UMHealthResearch.org website. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

PY - 2019/10/14

Y1 - 2019/10/14

N2 - ObjectivePerceived cognitive dysfunction in fibromyalgia (FM), “fibrofog,” is common. Prior laboratory‐based studies have limited our understanding of cognitive function in FM in daily life. The aim of this study is to explore levels of subjective and objective cognitive functioning and the association between subjective and objective aspects of cognition in persons with and without FM in the lived environment.MethodsParticipants (n=50 adults with FM; n= 50 adults without FM matched on age, sex, and education) completed baseline measures of subjective and objective (NIH Toolbox) cognitive functioning. Then, they completed ecological momentary assessments of cognitive clarity and speed and tests of processing speed and working memory, via a smart phone app, 5X/day for 8 days.ResultsOn baseline objective measures, the FM group demonstrated poorer cognitive functioning across three NIH Toolbox tests. There were no strong correlations between subjective and objective cognitive functioning in both the FM and control group. In the lived environment, the FM group demonstrated poorer subjective cognition and objective working memory; groups did not differ on processing speed. Momentary ratings of subjective cognitive dysfunction were significantly related to changes in objective processing speed but not working memory, with no group differences.ConclusionFindings indicate worse lab‐based and ambulatory subjective and objective cognitive function for those with FM compared to those without FM. Similar associations between measures of subjective and objective cognitive functioning for the groups suggest that people with FM are not overstating cognitive difficulties. Future research examining contributors to ambulatory fibrofog is warranted.

AB - ObjectivePerceived cognitive dysfunction in fibromyalgia (FM), “fibrofog,” is common. Prior laboratory‐based studies have limited our understanding of cognitive function in FM in daily life. The aim of this study is to explore levels of subjective and objective cognitive functioning and the association between subjective and objective aspects of cognition in persons with and without FM in the lived environment.MethodsParticipants (n=50 adults with FM; n= 50 adults without FM matched on age, sex, and education) completed baseline measures of subjective and objective (NIH Toolbox) cognitive functioning. Then, they completed ecological momentary assessments of cognitive clarity and speed and tests of processing speed and working memory, via a smart phone app, 5X/day for 8 days.ResultsOn baseline objective measures, the FM group demonstrated poorer cognitive functioning across three NIH Toolbox tests. There were no strong correlations between subjective and objective cognitive functioning in both the FM and control group. In the lived environment, the FM group demonstrated poorer subjective cognition and objective working memory; groups did not differ on processing speed. Momentary ratings of subjective cognitive dysfunction were significantly related to changes in objective processing speed but not working memory, with no group differences.ConclusionFindings indicate worse lab‐based and ambulatory subjective and objective cognitive function for those with FM compared to those without FM. Similar associations between measures of subjective and objective cognitive functioning for the groups suggest that people with FM are not overstating cognitive difficulties. Future research examining contributors to ambulatory fibrofog is warranted.

KW - fibromyalgia

KW - cognitive dysfunction

KW - fibrofog

KW - ambulatory assessment

KW - working memory,

KW - processing speed

U2 - 10.1002/acr.24089

DO - 10.1002/acr.24089

M3 - Article

C2 - 31609548

JO - Arthritis Care & Research

JF - Arthritis Care & Research

SN - 0893-7524

ER -