Fish oil supplementation augments post-exercise immune function in young males

Patrick Gray, Brendan Gabriel, Frank Thies, Stuart R Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Fish oils and related fatty acid components have anti-inflammatory properties, with beneficial effects against various disorders such as cardiovascular disease. A single bout of exercise can alter immune function. However, the effects of fish oil on immune function after a single bout of exercise are currently unknown. This study investigated the effect of supplementation with fish oil on the immune response to an acute bout of endurance exercise. METHODS: Sixteen male subjects underwent a sixweek double blind randomised placebo controlled supplementation trial involving two groups (fish oil or placebo oil, 3g/day). They attended for two visits, the first involving a maximal exercise test and the second involving a 1-h bout of endurance exercise on a cycle ergometer at 70% V¿O(2peak). Blood samples were taken pre-supplementation, pre-exercise (post-supplementation), immediately, 1 and 3h post-exercise. Samples were analysed for plasma IL-6, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and cortisol; peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-¿ production; neutrophil phagocytosis/oxidative burst; and natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. RESULTS: Post-supplementation EPA concentration was increased (P=0.0127) in the fish oil group. At 3h post-exercise PBMC IL-2 (P=0.0067) and NK cell activity (P=0.0163) was greater in the fish oil compared with the control group. However, PBMC IL-4 and IFN-¿ productions, plasma IL-6 and cortisol concentrations, as well as neutrophil activity were unaffected by fish oil supplementation. CONCLUSION: The current study demonstrates that fish oil supplementation reduces increases PBMC IL-2 production and NK cell cytotoxic activity in the recovery period after exercise.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1265-1272
Number of pages8
JournalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
Volume26
Issue number8
Early online date10 Aug 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

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Fish Oils
Blood Cells
Natural Killer Cells
Interleukin-2
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Interleukin-4
Hydrocortisone
Interleukin-6
Neutrophils
Placebos
Respiratory Burst
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Exercise Test
Phagocytosis
Oils
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Cardiovascular Diseases
Fatty Acids
Control Groups

Keywords

  • exercise
  • eicosapentaenoic acid
  • docosahexaenoic acid
  • NK cells
  • neutrophils

Cite this

Fish oil supplementation augments post-exercise immune function in young males. / Gray, Patrick; Gabriel, Brendan; Thies, Frank; Gray, Stuart R.

In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Vol. 26, No. 8, 11.2012, p. 1265-1272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gray, Patrick ; Gabriel, Brendan ; Thies, Frank ; Gray, Stuart R. / Fish oil supplementation augments post-exercise immune function in young males. In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. 2012 ; Vol. 26, No. 8. pp. 1265-1272.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: Fish oils and related fatty acid components have anti-inflammatory properties, with beneficial effects against various disorders such as cardiovascular disease. A single bout of exercise can alter immune function. However, the effects of fish oil on immune function after a single bout of exercise are currently unknown. This study investigated the effect of supplementation with fish oil on the immune response to an acute bout of endurance exercise. METHODS: Sixteen male subjects underwent a sixweek double blind randomised placebo controlled supplementation trial involving two groups (fish oil or placebo oil, 3g/day). They attended for two visits, the first involving a maximal exercise test and the second involving a 1-h bout of endurance exercise on a cycle ergometer at 70{\%} V¿O(2peak). Blood samples were taken pre-supplementation, pre-exercise (post-supplementation), immediately, 1 and 3h post-exercise. Samples were analysed for plasma IL-6, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and cortisol; peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-¿ production; neutrophil phagocytosis/oxidative burst; and natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. RESULTS: Post-supplementation EPA concentration was increased (P=0.0127) in the fish oil group. At 3h post-exercise PBMC IL-2 (P=0.0067) and NK cell activity (P=0.0163) was greater in the fish oil compared with the control group. However, PBMC IL-4 and IFN-¿ productions, plasma IL-6 and cortisol concentrations, as well as neutrophil activity were unaffected by fish oil supplementation. CONCLUSION: The current study demonstrates that fish oil supplementation reduces increases PBMC IL-2 production and NK cell cytotoxic activity in the recovery period after exercise.",
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AU - Gabriel, Brendan

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N2 - PURPOSE: Fish oils and related fatty acid components have anti-inflammatory properties, with beneficial effects against various disorders such as cardiovascular disease. A single bout of exercise can alter immune function. However, the effects of fish oil on immune function after a single bout of exercise are currently unknown. This study investigated the effect of supplementation with fish oil on the immune response to an acute bout of endurance exercise. METHODS: Sixteen male subjects underwent a sixweek double blind randomised placebo controlled supplementation trial involving two groups (fish oil or placebo oil, 3g/day). They attended for two visits, the first involving a maximal exercise test and the second involving a 1-h bout of endurance exercise on a cycle ergometer at 70% V¿O(2peak). Blood samples were taken pre-supplementation, pre-exercise (post-supplementation), immediately, 1 and 3h post-exercise. Samples were analysed for plasma IL-6, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and cortisol; peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-¿ production; neutrophil phagocytosis/oxidative burst; and natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. RESULTS: Post-supplementation EPA concentration was increased (P=0.0127) in the fish oil group. At 3h post-exercise PBMC IL-2 (P=0.0067) and NK cell activity (P=0.0163) was greater in the fish oil compared with the control group. However, PBMC IL-4 and IFN-¿ productions, plasma IL-6 and cortisol concentrations, as well as neutrophil activity were unaffected by fish oil supplementation. CONCLUSION: The current study demonstrates that fish oil supplementation reduces increases PBMC IL-2 production and NK cell cytotoxic activity in the recovery period after exercise.

AB - PURPOSE: Fish oils and related fatty acid components have anti-inflammatory properties, with beneficial effects against various disorders such as cardiovascular disease. A single bout of exercise can alter immune function. However, the effects of fish oil on immune function after a single bout of exercise are currently unknown. This study investigated the effect of supplementation with fish oil on the immune response to an acute bout of endurance exercise. METHODS: Sixteen male subjects underwent a sixweek double blind randomised placebo controlled supplementation trial involving two groups (fish oil or placebo oil, 3g/day). They attended for two visits, the first involving a maximal exercise test and the second involving a 1-h bout of endurance exercise on a cycle ergometer at 70% V¿O(2peak). Blood samples were taken pre-supplementation, pre-exercise (post-supplementation), immediately, 1 and 3h post-exercise. Samples were analysed for plasma IL-6, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and cortisol; peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-¿ production; neutrophil phagocytosis/oxidative burst; and natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity. RESULTS: Post-supplementation EPA concentration was increased (P=0.0127) in the fish oil group. At 3h post-exercise PBMC IL-2 (P=0.0067) and NK cell activity (P=0.0163) was greater in the fish oil compared with the control group. However, PBMC IL-4 and IFN-¿ productions, plasma IL-6 and cortisol concentrations, as well as neutrophil activity were unaffected by fish oil supplementation. CONCLUSION: The current study demonstrates that fish oil supplementation reduces increases PBMC IL-2 production and NK cell cytotoxic activity in the recovery period after exercise.

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