Fluid evolution in base-metal sulphide mineral deposits in the metamorphic basement rocks of southwest Scotland and Northern Ireland

M Baron, J Parnell

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Dalradian and Ordovician-Silurian metamorphic basement rocks of southwest Scotland and Northern Ireland host a number of base-metal sulphide-bearing vein deposits associated with kilometre-scale fracture systems. Fluid inclusion microthermometric analysis reveals two distinct fluid types are present at more than half of these deposits. The first is an H2O-CO2-salt fluid, which was probably derived from devolatilization reactions during Caledonian metamorphism. This stage of mineralization in Dalradian rocks was associated with base-metal deposition and occurred at temperatures between 220 and 360degreesC and pressures of between 1.6 and 1.9 kbar. Caledonian mineralization in Ordovician-Silurian metamorphic rocks occurred at temperatures between 300 and 360degreesC and pressures between 0.6 and 1.9 kbar. A later, probably Carboniferous, stage of mineralization was associated with base-metal sulphide deposition and involved a low to moderate temperature (T-h 70 to 240degreesC), low to moderate salinity (0 to 20 wt% NaCl eq.), H2O-salt fluid. The presence of both fluids at many of the deposits shows that the fractures hosting the deposits acted as long-term controls for fluid migration and the location of Caledonian metalliferous fluids as well as Carboniferous metalliferous fluids. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321
Number of pages19
JournalGeological Journal
Volume40
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • base-metal sulphide mineralization
  • fluid inclusions
  • HIGHLAND BOUNDARY FAULT
  • STABLE-ISOTOPE
  • GOLD MINERALIZATION
  • SOUTHERN UPLANDS
  • INCLUSION DATA
  • FLOW
  • SYSTEMS
  • PHASE
  • IMMISCIBILITY
  • TEMPERATURES

Cite this

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title = "Fluid evolution in base-metal sulphide mineral deposits in the metamorphic basement rocks of southwest Scotland and Northern Ireland",
abstract = "The Dalradian and Ordovician-Silurian metamorphic basement rocks of southwest Scotland and Northern Ireland host a number of base-metal sulphide-bearing vein deposits associated with kilometre-scale fracture systems. Fluid inclusion microthermometric analysis reveals two distinct fluid types are present at more than half of these deposits. The first is an H2O-CO2-salt fluid, which was probably derived from devolatilization reactions during Caledonian metamorphism. This stage of mineralization in Dalradian rocks was associated with base-metal deposition and occurred at temperatures between 220 and 360degreesC and pressures of between 1.6 and 1.9 kbar. Caledonian mineralization in Ordovician-Silurian metamorphic rocks occurred at temperatures between 300 and 360degreesC and pressures between 0.6 and 1.9 kbar. A later, probably Carboniferous, stage of mineralization was associated with base-metal sulphide deposition and involved a low to moderate temperature (T-h 70 to 240degreesC), low to moderate salinity (0 to 20 wt{\%} NaCl eq.), H2O-salt fluid. The presence of both fluids at many of the deposits shows that the fractures hosting the deposits acted as long-term controls for fluid migration and the location of Caledonian metalliferous fluids as well as Carboniferous metalliferous fluids. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd.",
keywords = "base-metal sulphide mineralization, fluid inclusions, HIGHLAND BOUNDARY FAULT, STABLE-ISOTOPE, GOLD MINERALIZATION, SOUTHERN UPLANDS, INCLUSION DATA, FLOW, SYSTEMS, PHASE, IMMISCIBILITY, TEMPERATURES",
author = "M Baron and J Parnell",
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AU - Parnell, J

PY - 2005

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N2 - The Dalradian and Ordovician-Silurian metamorphic basement rocks of southwest Scotland and Northern Ireland host a number of base-metal sulphide-bearing vein deposits associated with kilometre-scale fracture systems. Fluid inclusion microthermometric analysis reveals two distinct fluid types are present at more than half of these deposits. The first is an H2O-CO2-salt fluid, which was probably derived from devolatilization reactions during Caledonian metamorphism. This stage of mineralization in Dalradian rocks was associated with base-metal deposition and occurred at temperatures between 220 and 360degreesC and pressures of between 1.6 and 1.9 kbar. Caledonian mineralization in Ordovician-Silurian metamorphic rocks occurred at temperatures between 300 and 360degreesC and pressures between 0.6 and 1.9 kbar. A later, probably Carboniferous, stage of mineralization was associated with base-metal sulphide deposition and involved a low to moderate temperature (T-h 70 to 240degreesC), low to moderate salinity (0 to 20 wt% NaCl eq.), H2O-salt fluid. The presence of both fluids at many of the deposits shows that the fractures hosting the deposits acted as long-term controls for fluid migration and the location of Caledonian metalliferous fluids as well as Carboniferous metalliferous fluids. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd.

AB - The Dalradian and Ordovician-Silurian metamorphic basement rocks of southwest Scotland and Northern Ireland host a number of base-metal sulphide-bearing vein deposits associated with kilometre-scale fracture systems. Fluid inclusion microthermometric analysis reveals two distinct fluid types are present at more than half of these deposits. The first is an H2O-CO2-salt fluid, which was probably derived from devolatilization reactions during Caledonian metamorphism. This stage of mineralization in Dalradian rocks was associated with base-metal deposition and occurred at temperatures between 220 and 360degreesC and pressures of between 1.6 and 1.9 kbar. Caledonian mineralization in Ordovician-Silurian metamorphic rocks occurred at temperatures between 300 and 360degreesC and pressures between 0.6 and 1.9 kbar. A later, probably Carboniferous, stage of mineralization was associated with base-metal sulphide deposition and involved a low to moderate temperature (T-h 70 to 240degreesC), low to moderate salinity (0 to 20 wt% NaCl eq.), H2O-salt fluid. The presence of both fluids at many of the deposits shows that the fractures hosting the deposits acted as long-term controls for fluid migration and the location of Caledonian metalliferous fluids as well as Carboniferous metalliferous fluids. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd.

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KW - STABLE-ISOTOPE

KW - GOLD MINERALIZATION

KW - SOUTHERN UPLANDS

KW - INCLUSION DATA

KW - FLOW

KW - SYSTEMS

KW - PHASE

KW - IMMISCIBILITY

KW - TEMPERATURES

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SN - 0072-1050

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