Forests of consumption: postproductivism, postmaterialism and the postindustrial forest

Alexander Smith Mather

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    83 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Symptoms of postproductivism are more clearly developed in forestry than in agriculture, but they have attracted less attention. The postindustrial' forest, in which the emphasis placed on timber production is reduced relative to that placed on environmental services (such as biodiversity and recreation), epitomises the character of postproductive forestry. In many parts of the industrialised world, forests have essentially become places of consumption (of amenity, recreation, and wildlife observation) by a largely urban population, rather than places of production (of timber) for a largely urban population. Changing forestry and forest policy in Britain, mainland Europe, and North America are reviewed in the light of a trend towards postproductivism, and some of the causal factors underlying this trend are explored.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)249-268
    Number of pages19
    JournalEnvironment and Planning C: Government and Policy
    Volume19
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

    Keywords

    • MULTIPLE-USE FORESTRY
    • ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT
    • SOCIAL VALUES
    • RURAL SPACES
    • LAND
    • SOCIETIES
    • STATE

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