Frailty is associated with increased waiting time for relevant process of care measures; findings from the Emergency Laparoscopic & Laparotomy Scottish Audit (ELLSA)

Euan Ramsay, B Carter, Roy Soiza, S. Duffy, SJ Moug, Phyo Kyaw Myint* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Emergency Laparotomy (EmLAP) is one of the commonest surgical procedures in the UK,encompassing a wide range of acute abdominal conditions with significantly high postoperative morbidity and mortality1,2. Most patients undergoing EmLap are older adults (65 years and above) and have, until recently, been under-served by clinical research3 . The ELF Study (Emergency Laparotomy and Frailty) found frailty to be present in 20% of older adultsundergoing EmLap with increasing frailty associated with higher morbidity, mortality, and reduced independence at discharge4,5. As a result, both NELA (National Emergency Laparotomy Audit) and ELLSA (Emergency Laparoscopic & Laparotomy Scottish Audit)integrated frailty scoring into their national datasets to improve perioperative pathways for this vulnerable population..
Original languageEnglish
Article numberznab371
Pages (from-to)172–175
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Surgery
Volume109
Issue number2
Early online date9 Nov 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2022

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