Free Real-Time Communications for Free Software Communities: How RTC can improve collaboration and long term participation

Iain Ross Learmonth, Harsh Daftary

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

Abstract

Use of real-time communications (voice, video and chat) in free software communities.

Many communities have started running some kind of RTC infrastructure, such as Debian (SIP, XMPP and WebRTC), GNOME (XMPP) and the FedRTC.org service for Fedora (SIP, WebRTC). Some other communities are still debating the concept or trying to decide where to start. This session will look at questions like: where do we start? What is the support overhead? Can we do multi-party video calling entirely with free software? Is federation feasible, functional and worthwhile? How can this type of communication strengthen the connection people have with the community and their participation in the long term? How can the pub/sub and notification features of these services integrate with automated systems, such as FedMsg in Fedora?
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2016
EventFOSDEM 2016 - Brussels, Belgium
Duration: 30 Jan 201631 Jan 2016

Conference

ConferenceFOSDEM 2016
CountryBelgium
CityBrussels
Period30/01/1631/01/16

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Free Real-Time Communications for Free Software Communities : How RTC can improve collaboration and long term participation. / Learmonth, Iain Ross; Daftary, Harsh.

2016. FOSDEM 2016, Brussels, Belgium.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

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