Frequency effects in spoken and visual word recognition: Evidence from dual-task methodologies

Alexandra Alice Cleland, M. G. Gaskell, P. T. Quinlan, J. Tamminen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors report 3 dual-task experiments concerning the locus of frequency effects in word recognition. In all experiments, Task 1 entailed a simple perceptual choice and Task 2 involved lexical decision. In Experiment 1, an underadditive effect of word frequency arose for spoken words. Experiment 2 also showed underadditivity for visual lexical decision. It was concluded that word frequency exerts an influence prior to any dual-task bottleneck. A related finding in similar dual-task experiments is Task 2 response postponement at short stimulus onset asynchronies. This was explored in Experiment 3, and it was shown that response postponement was equivalent for both spoken and visual word recognition. These results imply that frequency-sensitive processes operate early and automatically.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-119
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2006

Keywords

  • psychological refractory period
  • frequency
  • word recognition
  • FIXED-EFFECT FALLACY
  • CHRONOMETRIC EVIDENCE
  • CENTRAL POSTPONEMENT
  • DIVIDED ATTENTION
  • SPEECH-PERCEPTION
  • ACTIVATION MODEL
  • LEXICAL ACCESS
  • INTERFERENCE
  • BOTTLENECK
  • PERFORMANCE

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